anonymous
  • anonymous
The lines below are perpendicular. If the slope of the green line is 2/3 , what is the slope of the red line? http://media.apexlearning.com/Images/200706/18/8ec58dbc-0f97-4779-8ac6-4e3ce2e61ca4.gif m= please help i am new to this.
Mathematics
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SOLVED
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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butterflydreamer
  • butterflydreamer
perpendicular lines means that when you multiply the slope of line 1 and slope of line 2 you will get -1 \[m_1 \times m_2 = -1 \] say slope of green line = m1 this means that: \[\frac{ 2}{ 3 } \times m_2 = -1 \] divide both sides by 2/3 to find m_2 (slope of red line)
butterflydreamer
  • butterflydreamer
so what i mean is: \[m_2 = -1 \div \frac{ 2 }{ 3} = ? \]
anonymous
  • anonymous
no real solutions .

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butterflydreamer
  • butterflydreamer
... nope... try again :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
I really do not know, I don't have a calculator sorry.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Can someone give me a answer this is depending on mine future :(
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
OpenStudy has a Code of Conduct in place and one of the rules is to never give direct answers!
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
Ok I have to ask . Is this question from a test @Marc_Bartra ?
butterflydreamer
  • butterflydreamer
welcome to the world of the internet :) go to google. type in "online calculator".. plug in the values and you'll be done.
anonymous
  • anonymous
so what do i do -1 ÷ 2/3 ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
and quiz
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
Ok. We're done! This is against OpenStudy's Terms and Conditions. This needs to stop.
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
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UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
@Abhisar take care of this.

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