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anonymous

  • one year ago

The following data show the height, in inches, of 11 different garden gnomes: 2 9 1 23 3 7 10 2 10 9 7 After removing the outlier, what does the mean absolute deviation of this data set represent?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I could take picture of question if needed?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Kash_TheSmartGuy

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Please help me.

  4. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    What do you think is the outlier?

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Tbh: I'm not sure

  6. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    It's 23.

  7. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    To determine the MAD of the data, add all the data together and divide by 11.

  8. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    You tell me what the outcome of that^

  9. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    @KAKES1967

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok

  11. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    I'm not gonna help you if you're not involved.

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    7.54?

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I added it all up i got 83

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Kash_TheSmartGuy

  15. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    Cool, now subtract the outlier from it, which is 23.

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    23-7.54=15.46

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Kash_TheSmartGuy

  18. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    No, subtract 23 from 83, which gives you 60. Divide 60 by 10.

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    6

  20. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    Now, subtract each set of data except for the outlier from 6 (6-2, 6-1, 6-9..)do not subtract 23.

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    4, 5, 3

  22. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    No, not from just the three of them, all of them (6-2, 6-9, 6-1, 6-3, 6-7, 6-10, 6-2, 6-10, 6-9, 6-7)

  23. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    Note: Negative answers are allowed.

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    4, -3, 5, 3, -1, -4, 4, -4, -3, -1

  25. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    Now, find the absolute value of the data. That is to drop all the negative signs in the data. Any negative number will become positive and positives will stay positive.

  26. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    That would result in: 4, 3, 5, 3, 1, 4, 4, 4, 3, 1.

  27. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    @KAKES1967 , you following?

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes i am paying attention

  29. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    Now, add all this together: 4, 3, 5, 3, 1, 4, 4, 4, 3, 1 and tell me what you get

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    32

  31. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    Now divide 32 by 10, you get 3.2 right?!

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so 3.2 and 6

  34. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    No. Just 3.2 Forget about 6.

  35. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    3.2 is your Mean Absolute deviation. It determines the distance between the mean and the average of the data.

  36. Kash_TheSmartGuy
    • one year ago
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    You get it?

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes i get it. thanks

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