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anonymous

  • one year ago

Find the Quotient of 20x^2y-88xy/-4xy

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  1. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    The problem is this, right? \[\Large \frac{20x^2y-88xy}{-4xy}\]

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes

  3. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    we can factor out -4xy from the numerator \[\Large \frac{20x^2y-88xy}{-4xy} = \frac{-4xy(-5x+22)}{-4xy} \] what comes next?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm having a very hard time understanding even from the beginning, if you can i would love for you to help explain it to me.

  5. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    well I factored out -4xy because that's what is in the denominator I want to cancel out the denominator

  6. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    did you learn about factoring yet?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i believe so but I'm not positive

  8. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    the idea of factoring is to rewrite a number or expression as a product of two smaller things

  9. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    ex: 27 = 9*3 16 = 8*2

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    could possibly be 22x^2y^2+20x^2y

  11. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    what do you mean?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    for the awnser i asked my mom and she said she thinks that is what it is

  13. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    have you learned about the distributive property?

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    is that not with (X)^Y

  15. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    it's something like 2*(x+y) = 2*x + 2*y

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yeah i have

  17. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    so when I factored back up at the top, I used the distributive property (in reverse)

  18. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    if you have 2*x + 2*y you can factor out 2 to get 2*(x+y)

  19. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    same idea with your problem, but I pulled out -4xy

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay im some what following lol

  21. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    it turns out that -4xy is a common factor of 20x^2y and -88xy

  22. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436404481447:dw|

  23. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436404502668:dw|

  24. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436404585098:dw|

  25. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436404604417:dw|

  26. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1436404621090:dw|

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    why would it not be -8xy?

  28. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    -8xy? where do you mean?

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    -4xy on both sides of the equation

  30. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    I'm not sure what you mean exactly, but this is what the full step by step picture looks like \[\Large \frac{20x^2y-88xy}{-4xy} = \frac{-4xy(-5x+22)}{-4xy} \] \[\Large \frac{20x^2y-88xy}{-4xy} = \frac{\cancel{-4xy}(-5x+22)}{\cancel{-4xy}} \] \[\Large \frac{20x^2y-88xy}{-4xy} = -5x+22 \] so the original expression simplifies to -5x+22

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay so they two cancel one another out correct?

  32. jim_thompson5910
    • one year ago
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    yeah they divide to 1 and go away effectively

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay i understand that

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