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anonymous

  • one year ago

HEEEEELP MEH PLZ The non-profit organization you volunteer for is throwing a fundraiser cookout. You are in charge of buying the hamburgers, which cost $3.00 per pound and hotdogs, which cost $2.00 per pound. The meat budget you are given totals $600. The inequality 3x + 2y less than or greater to 600 represents the possible combinations of pounds of hamburgers (x) and hotdogs (y) you can buy. Which of the following represents a solution to the inequality?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    GRAPH

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  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING? WHAT FOLLOWING?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oops forgot to put the choices 200 pounds of hamburgers and 140 pounds of hotdogs 150 pounds of hamburgers and 60 pounds of hotdogs 100 pounds of hamburgers and 240 pounds of hotdogs 240 pounds of hamburgers and 40 pounds of hotdogs @.Gjallarhorn.

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @radar @mathstudent55 @Michele_Laino @misssunshinexxoxo

  5. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    for example, if we use data from the first option, we get: \[3 \times 200 + 2 \times 140 = ...?\]

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    880? @Michele_Laino

  7. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    which is greater than 600, so the first option is not the right option

  8. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    now, using data from your second option, we get: \[3 \times 150 + 2 \times 60 = ...?\]

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    570? @Michele_Laino

  10. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    Correct! Being 570 less than 600, what can you conclude?

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    -30? im right?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Michele_Laino

  13. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    please wait a moment, I'm pondering....

  14. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    I think that your problem asks for all pairs (x,y) such that the subsequent condition 3x+2y < 600 is checked

  15. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    being 570 less than 600, then we can conclude that the pair (x=150, y=60) checks our condition above

  16. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    for example if we use data from the third option we get: 3*100+ 2*240= 780 which is greater than600, so the third pair, doesn't check our condition

  17. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    now, if we use data from the fourth option, we get: 3*240 + 2*40 = 720+80= 800> 600 so, also the pair (x=240, y=40) doesn't check our condition

  18. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    so, what is the pair which checks our condition?

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    :c

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @inkyvoyd Help?

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Vocaloid >.<

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @brynndelyn

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @freckles

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @calcmathlete

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You're trying to satisfy \(3x+2y \le600\), where x is the pounds of hamburgers and y is the pounds of hot dogs. Basically, go through each of the answer choices and check to see which satisfy the equation. Does that make sense?

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    *the inequality

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ah I see. Thanks! @Calcmathlete

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    No problem. :)

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