anonymous
  • anonymous
Find the limit of the function using cancellation techniques (-6 + x) / x^4 Please explain.
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
I know how to do cancellation, but only with numerators that are factor-able.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Like Use cancellation techniques to evaluate limit as x approaches -1 of 2x squared minus x minus 3 divided by (x + 1). You can factor the numerator as (2x -3)(x + 1). After cancelling out the common factor of (x+1), the limit can be evaluated using direct substation. The limit is equal to -5
Luigi0210
  • Luigi0210
@hartnn can help ya (:

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

hartnn
  • hartnn
separate the numerator \(-6/x^4 \) + \(x/x^4\) cancel out one x in the 2nd term
anonymous
  • anonymous
So \[-6/x^4 + x^3\]
hartnn
  • hartnn
-6/x^4 + 1/x^3
anonymous
  • anonymous
Why is 1 in the numerator?
hartnn
  • hartnn
|dw:1436550810803:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
Oh, that went right over my head.
anonymous
  • anonymous
So wouldn't it be 0 as the limit?
hartnn
  • hartnn
where does the x approach? x-> 0 ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I don't know. I was taught to just to insert whatever number, in this case 0, in the factored equation.
hartnn
  • hartnn
"in this case 0" you deduced that from the question, right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yeah. Wait, wouldn't it not exist?
hartnn
  • hartnn
" just to insert whatever number" is the worst way anyone can teach limits :P
anonymous
  • anonymous
It's virtual school. .-.
hartnn
  • hartnn
if x approaches 0, the numerator is negative, the denominator is very very near to 0 hence the limit will approach -infinity :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thats not an option...
hartnn
  • hartnn
*** negative number /0 = -infinity
hartnn
  • hartnn
what are the options? can yo post the screenshot of entire question and options?
anonymous
  • anonymous
1 Attachment
hartnn
  • hartnn
so they haven't introduced you to infinity yet... in that case, you can choose "Does Not Exist" as the answer. even though the limit exist and = - infinity
anonymous
  • anonymous
Exactly! It's basic math, but some websites say it would be 0, if and only if the x--> infinity.
hartnn
  • hartnn
when x-> infinity, means x is a very large number then 1/x will be very small number hence, 1/x^3 and 1/x^4 will approach 0 hence you limit will be = 0
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yep. Thank you for the help! I really appreciated it. cx
hartnn
  • hartnn
welcome ^_^
anonymous
  • anonymous
It was that they did not exist. cx @hartnn
hartnn
  • hartnn
so we were correct :)

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.