anonymous
  • anonymous
Phoenician access to the Mediterranean Sea led to the spread of the Phoenician system of government among Mediterranean civilizations the development of larger and better trained armies in nearby Egypt and Sumer the Greek's decision to invade Phoenicia in order to control their trade routes the widespread availability of glass across the Mediterranean region
History
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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anonymous
  • anonymous
@specialkate70 @misssunshinexxoxo
misssunshinexxoxo
  • misssunshinexxoxo
Phoenicia (UK /fɨˈnɪʃə/ or US /fəˈniːʃə/;[2] from the Greek: Φοινίκη, Phoiníkē; Arabic: فينيقية‎, Fīnīqīyah) was an ancient Semitic thalassocratic civilization situated on the western, coastal part of the Fertile Crescent and centered on the coastline of modern Lebanon. All major Phoenician cities were on the coastline of the Mediterranean, some colonies reaching the Western Mediterranean. It was an enterprising maritime trading culture that spread across the Mediterranean from 1550 BC to 300 BC. The Phoenicians used the galley, a man-powered sailing vessel, and are credited with the invention of the bireme.[3] They were famed in Classical Greece and Rome as 'traders in purple', referring to their monopoly on the precious purple dye of the Murex snail, used, among other things, for royal clothing, and for the spread of their alphabets, from which almost all modern phonetic alphabets are derived.
misssunshinexxoxo
  • misssunshinexxoxo
Which do you believe it is?

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anonymous
  • anonymous
c :)?
anonymous
  • anonymous
no, not that one
misssunshinexxoxo
  • misssunshinexxoxo
Phoenician access to the Mediterranean Sea led to the widespread availability of glass across the Mediterranean region
misssunshinexxoxo
  • misssunshinexxoxo
Best answer would be D.
anonymous
  • anonymous
thank you :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
im not sure if i agree with that but it could be right
anonymous
  • anonymous
what do you think it is
anonymous
  • anonymous
i think it could be c or b
anonymous
  • anonymous
hmm
misssunshinexxoxo
  • misssunshinexxoxo
The exports of Phoenicia as a whole included particularly cedar and pine wood, fine linen from Tyre, Byblos, and Berytos, cloths dyed with the famous Tyrian purple (made from the snail Murex), embroideries from Sidon, metalwork and glass, glazed faience, wine, salt, and dried fish. They received in return raw materials, such as papyrus, ivory, ebony, silk, amber, ostrich eggs, spices, incense, horses, gold, silver, copper, iron, tin, jewels, and precious stones. The name Byblos is Greek; papyrus received its early Greek name (byblos, byblinos) from its being exported to the Aegean through Byblos. Hence the English word Bible is derived from byblos as "the (papyrus) book." Read more: Phoenicia, Phoenician Trade & Ships http://phoenicia.org/trade.html#ixzz3fWgL3JWN
anonymous
  • anonymous
ill come back to that question when im done im gonna ask another :)
misssunshinexxoxo
  • misssunshinexxoxo
If you read this above; D is correct.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok then go with d :)

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