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anonymous

  • one year ago

Did I do this right? The way I did it is found out that f(x)=2/2=1 and that g(x)=2/6=1/3 (Not sure though because the line cuts off before the 2/3 -___- Then I created the problem 1/3=1+k, subtracted 1 and got the answer of k=-2/3 I think I might be going places because that most likely isn't the right answer :D http://i.imgur.com/3UW2wH7.png

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I meant 2/6 not 2/3

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok, whenever you add a number to a function like that, you're basically going to shift it up or down by that much. Something called a vertical shift.

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So, if you're adding a number 'k' to f(x) to get g(x), count how many vertical spaces they differ by at an x-value. Like, x = 0 would probably be the easiest. How much do the y-values differ at x=0?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    2?

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Not quite. When x = 0, look at what g(x) is first.

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    from two to six is four spaces

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    At x=0, g(x) is 2. Are you following me so far?

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So, at x=0, you want to see what f(x) is. What do you think f(x) is when x = 2?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    2?

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    When you're trying to find what the y-value of a function is with a certain x, what you want to do is go to that x-value and go up or down until you get to the line. So, start at x=0 and y=0, and then go up or down until you get to the line, f(x). Does that help?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So if x=2 then f(x)=2 because at x2 the line is at 2/2

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes. You're right. If you're going to use x=2, then what is g(x) when x = 2?

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    2/6?

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes, g(x) = 6 when x = 2. So now, you want to take the difference of the two numbers, and that'll be what k is :)

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so K = 4?

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes.

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Alright. Thank you very much :))

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    No problem. Also, in this kind of question, you can use any x-value you want to do it. That's why I said x=0 would be easiest because they y-values are right there on screen, which would've been 2 - (-2) = 4. You get it?

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yep

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