A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

moazzam07

  • one year ago

Please help i dont know how to do this!!!!

  • This Question is Closed
  1. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    1 Attachment
  2. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Are you home, so you have access to one of the objects the problem suggests? Do you have a ruler?

  3. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yes

  4. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i asnwered number 1 but i dont understand the rest @mathstudent55

  5. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Ok. What kind of object are you using? A cereal box, something else?

  6. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    a Box with 12 in Height, 12 in width, and 22 in length.

  7. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Ok. Great. Let me draw it below to help us answer the other questions.

  8. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Does that look like your box? |dw:1436729743433:dw|

  9. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yeah

  10. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Good. The answer to 1 is: 1. length = 22 in.; width = 12 in.; height = 12 in. Now let's look at part 2.

  11. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ok

  12. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    When the box is in this position sitting on a surface (the floor or a table top), a base is the face of the box that sits on the surface. The top of the box is the other base. The two bases of the box are the bottom face and the top face.

  13. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    so am i gonna list the surfaces?

  14. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Let's say we take a plane, and we let the plane go though the box. The plane must be parallel to the base, so it's a horizontal plane. I'll try to draw it for you.

  15. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ok

  16. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1436730068768:dw|

  17. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    If you were to cut the box along that plane, and you look at teh box from the top, what shape is the box seen from the top?

  18. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    a rectangle

  19. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1436730211052:dw|

  20. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Exactly.

  21. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Part 2. 2. a rectangle

  22. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Ok so far? Can we move on to part 3?

  23. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yes ok

  24. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    3. we need the surface area of the box. We are now back to the original box, not the cut box from part 2. The box has 6 faces. Each face is a rectangle. We can find the area of the 6 rectangles and add them all up. That is the surface are a of the box.

  25. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1436730424100:dw|

  26. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    We can take a short cut. Each two opposite faces have the same shape and area. We need to find the area of 3 different sides. Then we add them up and multiply by 2 since there are 2 faces of each size.

  27. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    wait only 4 faces are rectangles 12 by 12 in is a square

  28. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    There are 4 faces 12 in. by 22 in. There are 2 faces 12 in. by 12 in.

  29. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yeah

  30. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1436730608393:dw| The bottom, top, front and back faces measure 12 in. by 22 in. The right and left faces measure 12 in. by 12 in.

  31. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ok

  32. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    \(Total ~surface ~area = 4 \times (22 ~in. \times 12 ~in.) + 2 \times (12 ~in. \times 12 ~in.)\)

  33. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    What do you get for the total surface area?

  34. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    1056+288= 1344in?

  35. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Great. That's what I got too.

  36. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yay

  37. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ok wat does it mean by scale factor of 10

  38. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Ok. Part 4. If every dimension of the box (length, width, and height) were to become 10 times larger, what wiould the new total surface area be?

  39. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    A scale factor is a number you multiply something by to change its size. Here they ask you about a scale factor of 10. That means the length becomes 10 times larger, the width becomes 10 times larger, and the height becomes 10 times larger. Now the question is what will the new total surface area be?

  40. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    3,786 In

  41. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    How did you get that?

  42. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i mean 3,784

  43. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i added 10 to all the sides and remade the equation you made but this time with new numbers

  44. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    am i wrong?

  45. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    By the way, going back to part 3 for a second. The units must be units of area, so the total surface area is not 1344 in. It's 1344 in.^2. Square inches are units of area. Inches are units of length. Part 3 is an area, so the units are in.^2.

  46. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    OK. Let me explain the scale factor again. A scale factor is a number you MULTIPLY by a given number. You don't add to a number. That means each dimension is MULTIPLIED by 10. You don't add 10 to each dimension. In general, the term "factor" in math relates to multiplication, not to addition.

  47. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    am i wrong?

  48. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Yes, you are wrong because you added 10 to each dimension instead of multiplying each dimension by 10. Using the scale factor of 10 means each dimension now becomes 10 times larger. The length becomes 22 in. * 10 = 220 in. The width becomes 12 in. * 10 = 120 in. The height becomes 12 in. * 10 = 120 in.

  49. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    You can now find the total surface are like we did before, but using the new 10-times larger dimensions, or you can take a short cut and do it much faster.

  50. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    134400 in?

  51. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    When the linear dimensions (length, width, and height) change by a scale factor of k, the surface area changes by a scale factor of k^2.

  52. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    what is k

  53. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    \(Total ~surface ~area = 4 \times (220 ~in. \times 120 ~in.) + 2 \times (120 ~in. \times 120 ~in.)\) \(= 105,600~in.^2 + 28,800~in.^2 = 134,400 ~in.^2\)

  54. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yay so i was right

  55. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    k is the scale factor of the linear dimensions, length, width and height. In you case k is 10 since the linear dimensions went up by 10 times. That means the area goes up by k^2 times. Using 10 for k, the area goes up by 10^2 times = 100 times. The original area was 1,344 in^2. The new area is 1,344 in^2 * 100 = 134,400 in^2 As you can see, we get the same answer using the scale factor or using the area calculation.

  56. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Yes, you are correct. 4. 134,400 in^2

  57. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Now let's do part 5. How do you find the volume of a rectangular prism?

  58. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ok

  59. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    how do i find the vouloum

  60. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    It's like the volume of a cube. Multiply the length by the width by the height. \(V = LWH\)

  61. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    In part 5 you need the volume of the original box. Just multiply the length by the width and then by the height. \(V = LWH = 22~in. \times 12~in. \times 12~in. \) The units of the volume are \(in.^3\), called cubic inches.

  62. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I have to go. Let's finish this before I go. Do you get an answer to part 5?

  63. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Instructions Search your home for a rectangular prism. Some examples are a cereal box, a CD case, or a coffee table. Measure your prism using appropriate units, such as inches, centimeters, or feet. Complete the following. Show all work for calculations. 1. List the dimensions of your box. Be sure to include the units (in, cm, ft, etc.). 2. Describe the shape of the cross section when the box is cut parallel to the base. 3. What is the surface area of the box? 4. What is the surface area of the box if it is scaled up by a factor of 10? 5. What is the volume of the box? 6. What is the volume of the box if it is scaled down by a factor of $1/10$?

  64. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ok

  65. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i have got this so far

  66. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Instructions Search your home for a rectangular prism. Some examples are a cereal box, a CD case, or a coffee table. Measure your prism using appropriate units, such as inches, centimeters, or feet. Complete the following. Show all work for calculations. 1. List the dimensions of your box. Be sure to include the units (in, cm, ft, etc.) Answer to number 1: 12 in Height, 12 in width, and 22 in length. 2. Describe the shape of the cross section when the box is cut parallel to the base. Answer to number 2: A Rectangle 3. What is the surface area of the box? Answer to number 3: 1,344 in^2 4. What is the surface area of the box if it is scaled up by a factor of 10? 5. What is the volume of the box? Answer to number 5: 3,168 in 6. What is the volume of the box if it is scaled down by a factor of $1/10$?

  67. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Good. You did get part 5 correctly.

  68. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Now we need to do 6. When you apply a scale factor to a volume, you cube the scale factor. For example, if all sides change by a scale factor of 2, then the volume changes by a scale factor of 2^3. Since 2^3 = 2 * 2 * 2 = 8, the volume changes by 8 times.

  69. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yay

  70. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    In your case, they tell you they want the scale factor to be 1/10 That means the length, width and height will all become 1/10 of what they were. Since the scale factor is 1/10, the volume becomes the cube of 1/10 What is \(\Large \left(\dfrac{1}{10} \right)^3 = \dfrac{1}{10} \times \dfrac{1}{10} \times \dfrac{1}{10} = \)

  71. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ok

  72. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    1/100

  73. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    1/1000

  74. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    10 * 10 = 100 Here we have three 10's 10 * 10 * 10 = 1000

  75. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yes so 1/1000 rigth?

  76. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Correct. The volume becomes 1/1000 of what it was. Since the volume in part 5 was 3168 in.^3, now you divide that volume by 100 to find the answer to part 6.

  77. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    31.68

  78. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    In your answer above, make sure you use the correct units for part 5. A volume is in in.^3 (cubic inches), not plain in.

  79. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    You divided by 100, not by 1000.

  80. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    3168/1000 = ?

  81. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    3.168

  82. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Great. Remember the units for parts 5 and 6 are in.^3

  83. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Now let's do it the other way. The original box was 22 in. by 12 in. by 12 in. The original volume is: 22 in. * 12 in. * 12 in. = 3168 in.^3 We now apply a scale factor of 1/10 to each side: The new cube now measures: 2.2 in. by 1.2 in. by 1.2 in. The new volume is: 2.2 in. * 1.2 in. * 1.2 in. = 3.168 in.^3 As you can see, the new volume comes out the same using both methods of calculation.

  84. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ok

  85. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    do i put a ^3 for number 5 and 6

  86. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Yes, after "in." 5. 3168 in.^3 6. 3.168 in.^3

  87. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Also, parts 3 and 4 are areas, so the units are in.^2

  88. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    That is it! Bye.

  89. moazzam07
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    thanks bye

  90. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yw

  91. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.