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anonymous

  • one year ago

The table represents the change in the boiling point of water at different altitudes. Altitude (in thousands of feet) Boiling Point of Water (Fahrenheit) (sea level) 0 212 0.5 211.1 1.0 210 2.0 208.4 2.5 207.5 3.0 206.6 4.0 204.8 4.5 203.9 Determine the dependent and independent variables if this data were plotted. What would the slope of the graph represent?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Do you know how to find the slope of a line?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    it's Rise over run

  3. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    yes

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so how do I apply that to this problem

  5. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    well pick out 2 consecutive readings - say 4 , 204.8 and 4.5, 203.9 slope will be (203.9 - 204.8) / (4.5 - 2.0)

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so would it be For every increase of 1,000 feet in altitude, the boiling point of water decreases by 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit.

  8. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    yes - but second thoughts that might not be a very good estimate better to do the calculation over a bigger range best would be (203.9 - 211.1) / (4.5 - 0.5)

  9. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    - that still gives -1.8 lol

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok well the answer choices are A.For every increase of 1,000 feet in altitude, the boiling point of water increases by 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit. B.For every increase of 1,000 feet in altitude, the boiling point of water decreases by 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit. C.For every decrease of 1,000 feet in altitude, the boiling point of water decreases by 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit. D.For every increase of 1,800 feet in altitude, the boiling point of water decreases by 1 degree Fahrenheit. E.For every decrease of 1,800 feet in altitude, the boiling point of water decreases by 1 degree Fahrenheit. and I thought that that was the best answer

  11. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    yea that's B right

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok thank u :D

  13. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    yw

  14. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    do you know which are the dependent and indep[endent variables?

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Altitude is the independent and Fahrenheit is the dependent

  16. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    right

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thx

  18. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    yw

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