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anonymous

  • one year ago

I need help. Question is in comments

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Part A: Using the graph above, create a system of inequalities that only contain points D and E in the overlapping shaded regions. Explain how the lines will be graphed and shaded on the coordinate grid above. Part B: Explain how to verify that the points D and E are solutions to the system of inequalities created in Part A. Part C: Timothy can only attend a school in his designated zone. Timothy's zone is defined by y < 3x - 3. Explain how you can identify the schools that Timothy is allowed to attend.

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  3. nikato
    • one year ago
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    have you tried it yet?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I have tried it, I am just awful at system of inequalities ..

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Do you do the order pair like ( 0, 4 ) & ( 1, 4 )?

  6. nikato
    • one year ago
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    no. it'll be better to sepearte the x and y

  7. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    do you know how to graph an inequality?

  8. nikato
    • one year ago
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    lets look at the x- coordiate. what two numbers are D and E between?

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    1, 0, -1?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    J i think I know how to graph inequalities, is that what i have to do here?

  11. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    pretty much, yes

  12. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    only thing is youj need the inequalites equations, is all

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm sorry I am really bad at this .

  14. nikato
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437088210344:dw| now this is where D and E are

  15. nikato
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437088327956:dw| and if you look at the x-coordiate, its somewhere between these two numbers, right?

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

  17. nikato
    • one year ago
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    and how would you write this as an inequaulity?

  18. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    notice the primary colors recall that yellow and red make green notice where they go about notice those lines use those lines, or those points given, to get the equations for the inequalities

  19. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    notice that if you use those 2 lines and their shaded "true" regions they intersect on the "green zone", that comprises D and E

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes so um

  21. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    so... get the equations for those lines first :)

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    -2+4 < 2+4? I really don't know Im sorry.. Math isn't really my thing ..

  23. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    well... have you covered "slopes" yet?

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes but its pretty recent I haven't "mastered," it..

  25. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    ok well... let's ... hmmm seee if we can get the lline equations first notice, the equations for lines AF and lines BC are what we're after one sec

  26. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    C is the point (2,1) and B is the point (-4,-2) Find the slope of the line joining those two points.

  27. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    \(\bf \begin{array}{lllll} &x_1&y_1&x_2&y_2\\ % (a,b) A&({\color{red}{ -5}}\quad ,&{\color{blue}{ 5}})\quad % (c,d) F&({\color{red}{ 3}}\quad ,&{\color{blue}{ -4}})\\ B&({\color{red}{ -4}}\quad ,&{\color{blue}{ -2}})\quad % (c,d) C&({\color{red}{ 2}}\quad ,&{\color{blue}{ 1}}) \end{array} \\\quad \\ % slope = m slope = {\color{green}{ m}}= \cfrac{rise}{run} \implies \cfrac{{\color{blue}{ y_2}}-{\color{blue}{ y_1}}}{{\color{red}{ x_2}}-{\color{red}{ x_1}}} \\ \quad \\ % point-slope intercept y-{\color{blue}{ y_1}}={\color{green}{ m}}(x-{\color{red}{ x_1}})\qquad \textit{plug in the values and solve for "y"}\\ \qquad \uparrow\\ \textit{point-slope form}\) anyhow... there get the slopes of those, and then get their EQUAtions first so we can get the inequality after

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Is there any simpler way of explaining it?

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    or no? because I could figure it out I would just need time ..

  30. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    hmmm doubt it, that's... kinda straightforward methinks

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ah okie Well then I better get to researching .-.

  32. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    k

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I give up :') thanks guys for trying .

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