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anonymous

  • one year ago

The planet Jupiter rotates every 9.9 hours and has a diameter of 88,846 miles. If you’re standing on its equator, how fast are you travelling?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @dan815 :)

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437143670025:dw|

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Koikkara Hey!

  4. MrNood
    • one year ago
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    relative to what?

  5. MrNood
    • one year ago
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    work out the ANGULAR velocity in rad/s (omega) the linear velocity of the equator is r times omega be careful of the units miles/sec miles per hour.....

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So Ill be using Linear Speed or Angular Speed formula?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @ganeshie8 @KyanTheDoodle @Koikkara @amoodarya @sleepyhead314 @BloomLocke367 Anyone willing to help meeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

  8. Koikkara
    • one year ago
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    \(Ref:\) http://www.wiley.com/college/sc/trigonometry/resources/annotated_instructors_edition/Young_Trig_3e_AIE_c03RadianMeasureandtheUnitCircleApproach.pdf Might help you as I forgot the tricks behind it to solve easily.

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Will check it... thanks koi

  10. KyanTheDoodle
    • one year ago
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    I believe the formula is distance / time = speed. So if the distance is 88,848 miles, and the time is 9.9 hours...

  11. KyanTheDoodle
    • one year ago
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    Sorry. *88,846

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What formula will be used? Need help plssss :(

  13. KyanTheDoodle
    • one year ago
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    If you divide the distance by time, then you get the speed

  14. MrNood
    • one year ago
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    @KyanTheDoodle that is not correct the distance travelled by the equator is I rev in 9.9 hours I rev = 2 pi radians

  15. MrNood
    • one year ago
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    work out the ANGULAR velocity in rad/s (omega) the linear velocity of the equator is r times omega

  16. KyanTheDoodle
    • one year ago
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    Doesn't necessarily mean I'm not correct. As 100 miles divided by 1 hour is still 100 miles an hour, but 100 miles divided by 2 hours is 50 miles an hour.

  17. KyanTheDoodle
    • one year ago
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    But I DO see that it's the diameter

  18. MrNood
    • one year ago
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    @KyanTheDoodle you have quoted the distance travelled as the diameter - that is NOT the distance travelled - so you are incorrect

  19. KyanTheDoodle
    • one year ago
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    Yes, I literally just said that I was wrong on that part. But the rest is right. I just misread the situation.

  20. MrNood
    • one year ago
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    another way to look at it is distance travelled = circumference of eqator (you know the radius so this is easy to work out) velocity is then circumference /time to rotate 1 circumference

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Meaning, Ill get the circumference by 2(pi)radius, then divide it by the time (9.9 hours) what unit is the answer?

  22. KyanTheDoodle
    • one year ago
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    You could do that, or just once with the diameter given.

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