anonymous
  • anonymous
What was the significance of the Supreme Court's ruling in the Marbury vs. Madison case? The ruling determined that Congress could act against the president if it wished. The ruling determined that the Supreme Court was more powerful than the president. The ruling determined that laws that violated the U.S. Constitution could be thrown out. The ruling determined that presidents could not remove judges appointed by their predecessor.
History
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Marbury v. Madison, arguably the most important case in Supreme Court history, was the first U.S. Supreme Court case to apply the principle of "judicial review" -- the power of federal courts to void acts of Congress in conflict with the Constitution.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Marcorie so which answer would it be
anonymous
  • anonymous
Which one do you think it is?

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
@Marcorie idk thats why i asked you lol
anonymous
  • anonymous
i know but what do you think it is take a guess ill tell you if your right or wrong
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Marcorie The ruling determined that laws that violated the U.S. Constitution could be thrown out.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Well since the power of federal courts was to void acts of Congress in conflict with the Constitution. Written in 1803 by Chief Justice John Marshall, the decision played a key role in making the Supreme Court a separate branch of government on par with Congress and the executive.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@misssunshinexxoxo
anonymous
  • anonymous
@aryandecoolest @Belovett @DarkMoonZ
misssunshinexxoxo
  • misssunshinexxoxo
Marbury v. Madison, arguably the most important case in Supreme Court history, was the first U.S. Supreme Court case to apply the principle of "judicial review" -- the power of federal courts to void acts of Congress in conflict with the Constitution. Written in 1803 by Chief Justice John Marshall, the decision played a key role in making the Supreme Court a separate branch of government on par with Congress and the executive. The facts surrounding Marbury were complicated. In the election of 1800, the newly organized Democratic-Republican party of Thomas Jefferson defeated the Federalist party of John Adams, creating an atmosphere of political panic for the lame duck Federalists. In the final days of his presidency, Adams appointed a large number of justices of peace for the District of Columbia whose commissions were approved by the Senate, signed by the president, and affixed with the official seal of the government. The commissions were not delivered, however, and when President Jefferson assumed office March 5, 1801, he ordered James Madison, his Secretary of State, not to deliver them. William Marbury, one of the appointees, then petitioned the Supreme Court for a writ of mandamus, or legal order, compelling Madison to show cause why he should not receive his commission.
misssunshinexxoxo
  • misssunshinexxoxo
Seems like a violation to the constitution.
anonymous
  • anonymous
i thought it was The ruling determined that Congress could act against the president if it wished.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Marbury v. Madison, 5 U.S. (Cranch 1) 137 (1803) is a landmark case in United States law. It formed the basis for the exercise of judicial review in the United States under Article III of the Constitution. This case resulted from a petition to the Supreme Court by William Marbury, who had been appointed by President John Adams as Justice of the Peace in the District of Columbia but whose commission was not subsequently delivered. Marbury petitioned the Supreme Court to force Secretary of State James Madison to deliver the documents, but the court, with John Marshall as Chief Justice, denied Marbury's petition, holding that the statute upon which he based his claim, the Judiciary Act of 1789, was unconstitutional. Marbury v. Madison was the first time the Supreme Court declared something "unconstitutional," and established the concept of judicial review in the U.S. (the idea that courts may oversee and nullify the actions of another branch of government). The landmark decision helped define the "checks and balances" of the American form of government.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Why complicate things, the case is clearly defined as giving birth to judicial review. Judicial review is the process where the Supreme Court can rule a law unconstitutional when it is being reviewed during a case. Unconstitutional = violating the constitution of a nation. Ergo, the answer choice, "the ruling determined that laws that violated the U.S. Constitution could be thrown out." Makes most sense. Peace.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.