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vera_ewing

  • one year ago

What chemical equation represents

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  1. vera_ewing
    • one year ago
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  2. vera_ewing
    • one year ago
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    @taramgrant0543664

  3. vera_ewing
    • one year ago
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    I think it's A or B...but not 100% sure

  4. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    I was thinking A as the H or proton moves from one to the other

  5. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    For B the Cl just appears but that is negative charged so B doesn't make sense

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm not the best with this, but is it possible that it could be D? Because I thought if it could donate, then it would be losing one of them in the solution This is both an attempted answer and also a question lol

  7. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    H2O is a proton acceptor when it reacts with an acid and a proton donor when reacting with a base

  8. Ciarán95
    • one year ago
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    If something is donating a proton, then it must be losing a H+ from its chemical formula...so we're looking for a species which changes from being neutral in the reactants (left-hand side) to now having a negative charge on it in the products (right-hand side). We're also told that the chemical in question must be able to donate/ lose this H+ in water...this suggests that the water (H2O) molecules themselves will be involved in the reaction, as they will be accepting the proton that is being donated in the reaction. So, we're also looking possibly for some reaction in which water is present in the reactants and is then present in the products bonded to these donated H+ ions. All these clues seem to point to A as being the only possible equation.

  9. vera_ewing
    • one year ago
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    Ah, I get it. Thanks so much! :)

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