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anonymous

  • one year ago

What effect does the speaker wish to achieve by using the words commodities and barter in his speech? A)to incite the audience against African kings and princes b)to encourage the audience to oppose trade with Africa c)to imply the superiority of European nations d)to highlight how the slave trade degrades its victims

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What do you think it is? :)

  2. misssunshinexxoxo
    • one year ago
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    Any speech that goes with this?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    idk i keep reading it +over and over but i don't seem to get it

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Horrors of the Slave Trade speech by William Wilberforce, delivered May 12, 1789 (excerpt) We see then, in the nature of things, how easily the practises of Africa are to be accounted for. Her kings are never compelled to war, that we can hear of, by public principles, by national glory, still less by the love of their people. In Europe it is the extension of commerce, the maintenance of national honor, or some great public object, that is ever the motive to war with every monarch; but, in Africa, it is the personal avarice and sensuality of their kings. These two vices of avarice and sensuality, the most powerful and predominant in natures thus corrupt, we tempt, we stimulate in all these African princes, and we depend upon these vices for the very maintenance of the slave trade. Does the king of Barbessin want brandy? He has only to send his troops, in the night-time, to burn and desolate a village; the captives will serve as commodities, that may be bartered with the British trader. The slave trade, in its very nature, is the source of such kind of tragedies; nor has there been a single person, almost, before the privy council, who does not add something by his testimony to the mass of evidence upon this point. Some, indeed, of these gentlemen, and particularly the delegates from Liverpool, have endeavored to reason down this plain principle; some have palliated it; but there is not one, I believe, who does not more or less admit it. Some, nay most, I believe, have admitted the slave trade to be the chief cause of wars in Africa.

  5. misssunshinexxoxo
    • one year ago
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    Main idea; "We see then, in the nature of things, how easily the practices of Africa are to be accounted for. Her kings are never compelled to war, that we can hear of, by public principles, by national glory, still less by the love of their people."

  6. misssunshinexxoxo
    • one year ago
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    Talks about slavery pretty much second paragraph

  7. misssunshinexxoxo
    • one year ago
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    Seems like D looks good.

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @misssunshinexxoxo thank you sooo much !!!

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I think it would be D also. But i'm pretty stuck between D and A.

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the answer was D

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    That's good! At least you got it correct :)

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