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anonymous

  • one year ago

Would anyone mind telling me how to find the electron configuration of element(s) works? I could really use help in trying to understand how we get the orbitals.

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  1. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    u want a link to a website or what?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Rushwr A like would also be helpful, but I was wondering if anyone could give me an explanation of how it works.

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    A website* Sorry about the typo.

  4. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    You add electrons as you move across the periodic table. Number of electrons should equal the number of protons. But, when you're doing elctron configuration, what you're really talking about are it's valence electrons, which are the ones on the outer shell and are the ones that do bonding. For instance, hydrogen has one electron (and one proton) |dw:1437432100006:dw| this would have electron configuration of 1s\(^1\) or simply 1s, which is represented by an arrow pointing up. \(\sf \uparrow\) As you move across, say to helium, you have now 1s\(^2\) because you have TWO electrons now in the s-orbital. so it is \(\sf \uparrow \downarrow\) remember by pauli exclusion princiiple, no two electrons can have same two electron spins. Which is why one has an arrow up and arrow pointing down. s orbital can only fit \(\sf \color{Red}{maximum}\) 2 electrons, next you move to say, oxygen, which has configuration of 1s\(^2\) 2s\(^2\)2p\(^4\) here, you go into the p-orbital, which can hold a maximum of \(\sf \color{red}{6~electrons}\) when you have a fully filled electron with 2 s-orbitals and 6 p-orbitals, you have completed the "octet rule" and you have yourself a noble gas.

  5. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    You might want to read your book to get a further understanding. This can take about 1 or 2 lectures in a class to cover, depending at what level you're at. In high school this could be covered in a week, but in college, maybe 2 lectures.

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    It doesn't really go in depth the process of going across the periodic table, it discusses the aspects of what the orbitals are. I understand n,l, ml, and ms. What I don't understand is how you fill those orbitals according to the periodic table. I understand how there are different blocks, but what is the order I go in to fill those orbitals correctly? How is manganese1s2 2s2 2p6 3s2 3p6 3d5 4s2?

  7. kaibaseto
    • one year ago
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    Okay, so when the it reaches to the point after the 4s2 orbital, the d# must be first, however the # would be one step back from the s# in the order. In this example that is 3d5.

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay, I understand how we have 4s^2 and 3d^5. So, how did we get the rest? Just by following the order of electron configuration?

  9. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    If you're in high school, you do not need to worry much about d-orbital much. Just know that elements after argon in the transition metal series, fill d-orbitals first due to energy level being lower than p-orbital. Less energy is better. However, filling electrons for d-orbital species even at introductory level chemistry, will not be tested on an exam, unless specifically specified by your instructor. It gets a bit more complex since you start dealing with electron stability and reactivity, hardness or softness of the metal species, and so forth.

  10. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    Also, the d-orbital can hold a maximum of 10 electrons.

  11. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437439002416:dw|

  12. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    mangenes is: 1s2 2s2 2p6 (this is the electron configuration for Ar) 3s2 3p6 4s2 3d5 because you start going into d-orbital (which is lower in energy than p), you fill that up first. so that is why you have [Ar]4s\(^2\)3d\(^5\) there. the d-orbital takes on one less number than the p-orbital, so you have 3, instead of 4d

  13. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    http://www.ptable.com

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm not in high school, I'm taking general chemistry in college and I'm going to be studying chemistry for most of my college career--so, I really do appreciate your explanations as well as the others provided.

  15. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    Still, even in general chemistry, you do not dive into d-orbitals that much. If you do pursue chemistry as a major, you will learn more about d-orbitals and their stability and reactivity when you reach inorganic chemistry.

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    This is a wonderful periodic table, I think if I study this enough I'll be able to understand the organizational pattern or at least get a general idea. Thank you for taking your time to explain this to me and give me such useful tools to study from. Good luck with your organic chemistry question, I wish I could be as helpful as you were to me.

  17. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    It's just a challenge question, open to anyone. I will post more as time passes, and maybe when you can try them when you finish a year of organic.

  18. abb0t
    • one year ago
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    best of luck. cheers.

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