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anonymous

  • one year ago

Slope tutorial!

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    First of all: You gotta know two points on your graph. Lets call these points (\[(x_{1},y_{1})\] and\[(x_{2},y_{2})\]

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Next to find the actual slope, you have to use the formula: \[\frac{y_{2}-y_{1}}{ x_{2}-x_{1} }\]

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    For example, if you were trying trying to find the slope of the two points (1,2) and (9,4) Use the slope formula and the equation would look something like this: \[\frac{ 4-2 }{ 9-1 }\]

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Then you would turn up with an answer of: \[\frac{ 2 }{ 8 }\]

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Which can be simplified to \[\frac{ 1 }{ 4 }\]

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The slope of the graph with points (1,2) and (9,4) is: \[\frac{ 1 }{ 4 } or 0.25\]

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Shortest OS tutorial complete! XD

  8. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    congrats :=)

  9. Setsuna-Yuregeshi
    • one year ago
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    I never understand why you simplify the slope, when you do that, how would you find the next points?

  10. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    what do you mean my simplify slope?

  11. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    @Icedragon50 how would you calculate the slope using your formula in this type of problem http://openstudy.com/study#/updates/55af0b30e4b04559507a20c1

  12. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437541549625:dw|

  13. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437541598591:dw|

  14. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437541645971:dw|

  15. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437541681892:dw|

  16. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437541782916:dw|

  17. dan815
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437541858828:dw|

  18. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437541928237:dw|

  19. dan815
    • one year ago
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    whats awesome is someone who doesnt know english, would think that was just a pattern on this rabbit snake

  20. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    laughing out loud

  21. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    Hello, Icedragon50, nice work! Just a quick latex advise for what you have wrote \(\dfrac{1}{4}or0.25\) you can use ~ for a space (and the more ~ you put, the more space you get). `\(\dfrac{1}{4}~or~0.25\)` (see how I used the ~ for space?) and it gives you \(\dfrac{1}{4}~or~0.25\) or, even better with \rm font, and more space. `\(\dfrac{1}{4}~~{\rm or}~~0.25\)` and it gives you: \(\dfrac{1}{4}~~{\rm or}~~0.25\)

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