Photon336
  • Photon336
Chem problem Will post it in a bit.
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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Photon336
  • Photon336
Here it is
1 Attachment
Photon336
  • Photon336
@Rushwr
Photon336
  • Photon336
@Cuanchi

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Photon336
  • Photon336
Thought it was a good idea to post this. it's kind of tricky
Cuanchi
  • Cuanchi
Do you include the solids in the Keq? why?
Photon336
  • Photon336
@Cuanchi \[K _{eq} = \frac{ [C]^x[D]^y }{ [A]^c[B]^d }\] they don't give us any information about the Keq, but i totally misread it, like i figure that solids wont be included in that but the explanation was "their concentarations don't change much" but isn that the same for liquids?
Cuanchi
  • Cuanchi
Yes pure liquids (l) and solids (s) are not included in the equilibrium constant, only gases (g) and aqueous (aq) are included.
Cuanchi
  • Cuanchi
from which manual did you got that question?
Photon336
  • Photon336
that has to do with how [ ] changes right?
Photon336
  • Photon336
the books are called McGraw-Hill's 500 questions if you guys are interested
Photon336
  • Photon336
i didn't even read the question and then thought oh if I add more of the solid should increase the rate.
taramgrant0543664
  • taramgrant0543664
Happens to everyone, I know I like to think liquids count for a lot more stuff than they actually do. But going back to the question so the only compound that is included is the Cl2 meaning that Keq=1/[Cl2]. I think that when Keq is greater than one there is a lot of product so the reaction wants to go left but when Keq is less than one the reaction goes to the right (I think that's right).
Photon336
  • Photon336
There's Keq and then Kc something like that.
Photon336
  • Photon336
Don't remember off the top of my head; i believe that it's Kq not Kc Something like when Q < K rxn goes to the right. Q>K rxn goes to left.
Photon336
  • Photon336
So Tara SnCl2 would be considered a pure liquid? Originally I thought it was [SnCl2]/[Cl2]
taramgrant0543664
  • taramgrant0543664
Found a pretty good link for the rules for K and Q partly because I am always forgetting them http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Physical_Chemistry/Equilibria/Chemical_Equilibria/The_Reaction_Quotient/Difference_Between_K_And_Q Also why pure liquid for SnCl2 I thought that was a solid?
Photon336
  • Photon336
@taramgrant0543664 i meant to put SnCl4 in the expression. mistake lol
taramgrant0543664
  • taramgrant0543664
Haha mistakes happen to everybody!! The SnCl4 I wouldn't but it in the equation since you don't put liquids into the equation and it wouldn't count in the equilibrium since the solution has to either be aqueous or a gas

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