muscrat123
  • muscrat123
WILL MEDAL AND FAN how do u find the theoretical probability
Mathematics
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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muscrat123
  • muscrat123
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
muscrat123
  • muscrat123

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anonymous
  • anonymous
is that the whole question ??
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
no. it my personal question
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
to help solve a different ?
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
? = question
anonymous
  • anonymous
no im just saying b/c thats non specific question. you dont find it, its a way of thinking that can relate to possible answers, get what im saying ?
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
sorta. but my school says this is how u find it and i dont understand \[\frac{ outcomes }{ number~of~possible~outcomes }\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
its like weighing the options you have. idk how to explain it
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
yes!!!
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
theoretical theory... lol...
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
thats exactly what im trying to do. hang on
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
a coin can fall on either heads or tails.... (right?) So how many possible outsomes is there?
anonymous
  • anonymous
2
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
flipping the coin 100, omg, slap the teacher:O
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
i posted in comments what i have to submit
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
i have to flip TWO coins 100 times lol
anonymous
  • anonymous
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
meow
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
ok... experimental probability. Do you know what this term means?
anonymous
  • anonymous
meow
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
the number of desired outcomes divided by the total # of trials. what is a desired outcome? and the total # of trials is what? in this case
anonymous
  • anonymous
correct!
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
the desired number of outcomes varies. the total number fo trials is 100
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
the I mean number of desired outcomes.
anonymous
  • anonymous
~meow~
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
but what is the desired # of outcomes in this case? IM SO CONFUSED :( !!!!!!!!!
anonymous
  • anonymous
o wait no sorry
anonymous
  • anonymous
i made a mistake sorry
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
@emma.elizabeth5683
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
For a question: 2. What is the experimental probability that a coin toss results in two heads showing? desired outcome is when both coins lands on heads. the number of desired outcomes, is the number of times when both coins landed on heads. the total number of trials is the number times you have tossed (i.e. 100)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Number of ways to succeed is one Number of possible outcomes is two Probability of getting heads is 1/2
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
so 32 / 100 for theoretical probability?
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
number of desired outcomes / total number of trials is experimental probability
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
i meant 32 / 3
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
or 100 / 3?
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
im so confused
anonymous
  • anonymous
what is your exact question given to you? c:
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
so experimental probability (for question 2) is: (if you don't remember question 2, please read it) \(P=\rm (number~of~desired~outcomes)/(total~number~of~trials)\) \(P=\rm (32)/(100)\) \(P=\rm 0.32~~~~~or,~~8/25\)
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
i said 32/100 first!!!
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
yes
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
its 32% for the theoretical probability, yes?
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
and that is experimental probability for tossing both coins tails
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
i confused the info 2 tails = 28 times 2 heads = 32 times
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
yes
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
So, for question 2 it is 32% and for question 4 it is ? (do the same thing as we did for question 2)
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
wait...im still on ? #1
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
whats #1?
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
u know what "theoretical probability" is?
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
no..that was my initial question
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
well sorta
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
campbell_st
  • campbell_st
theoretical probability is what you expect to happen if you toss a coin P(head) = 1/2 and P(tail) = 1/2 its as simple as that
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
theoretical probability. We don't look at any experiments that took place before. How many outcomes does a paticular operation (for ex. tossing a coin) can have? Now, what are the chances that it will behave in a particular way? The coin example: A coin can land on either heads or tails. What is a chance that coin lands on tails? It is 1/2.... So the theoretical probability of the coin landing on tails is 1/2.
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
so it is 33%?
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
What is the chance that both coins will land on heads? The first coin has a 1/2 (or 50%) chance of landing on heads. The second coin has a 1/2 (or 50%) chance of landing on heads as well. But these are dependent events (since you want both of these to occur, so that both coins land on heads). This means that we multiply the probabilities/chances. ½ • ½ = ¼ (or 25%)
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
Again, we aren't looking at how many times you have tossed the coins. The experiment is IRRELEVANT to any theoretical probability question that you have.
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
im still really confused and it needs to be done by 5
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
!!!
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
anonymous
  • anonymous
what the question
Elsa213
  • Elsa213
@KyanTheDoodle is smart. Probably she can help. c:
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
i attached it in the comments. ill attach it again though
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
im having trouble determining what a desirable outcome is
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
@Skielerlucas04 plz DONT LEAVE!!!
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
\(im~very~desperate!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!~\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
idk how to do this, i have a LOT of work to do myself
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
do u know what a desirable outcome is?
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
@SolomonZelman can u help me more?
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
ughhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Kash_TheSmartGuy
  • Kash_TheSmartGuy
Ok. calm down
Kash_TheSmartGuy
  • Kash_TheSmartGuy
Let's start with an example okay?
Kash_TheSmartGuy
  • Kash_TheSmartGuy
Kash_TheSmartGuy
  • Kash_TheSmartGuy
Suppose you have a coin and your favor is to have tails. The theoretical probability would be: \[\frac{ Possible FovorableOutcomes }{ Number Of Outcomes }\]So that would result in a theoretical probability of \[\frac{ 1 }{ 2 }\]
Kash_TheSmartGuy
  • Kash_TheSmartGuy
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
nevermind. i figured it out on my own. and it would be 33.3% , not 50% bc there are 3 possible outcomes
Kash_TheSmartGuy
  • Kash_TheSmartGuy
I mentioned jay because in middle of testing.
KyanTheDoodle
  • KyanTheDoodle
Woah! Woah woah! I don't know how to read!
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
muscrat123
  • muscrat123
u dont know how 2 read?

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