anonymous
  • anonymous
A triangle has coordinates A (1, 5), B (-2, 1) and C (0, -4). What are the new coordinates if the triangle is dilated with a scale factor of 1/5 ?
Mathematics
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
Do I use the formula A' = A*f?
triciaal
  • triciaal
|dw:1437619623775:dw|

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anonymous
  • anonymous
But do I use the formula that I mentioned?
triciaal
  • triciaal
scale factor each length changes by factor to get the new length
triciaal
  • triciaal
not sure what your formula represents
anonymous
  • anonymous
A' stands for the new point, A stands for the original point, and f stands for scale factor
triciaal
  • triciaal
with my approach the lengths are changing AB BC and AC start at one location then change to find new coordinates
anonymous
  • anonymous
The new coordinates I got are A = (1/5 , 1) ; B = (-2/5 , 1/5) ; C = (0, -4/5)
anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
Could u help me out?
anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
Are my new coordinates correct @SolomonZelman ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
There are different ways of dilation, but the most common if you are not asked to do it otherwise is to obtain the distance from the point of origin (0,0) to the coordinates one-by-one and factor it. Here is an example.|dw:1437621122694:dw|
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
|dw:1437621312440:dw|
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
|dw:1437621423014:dw|
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
|dw:1437621698705:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
But this doesn't give me the coordinates...
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
it doesn't right away, but if you think about it, the distance formula is a derivation of the pythagorean theorem, which will allow you to work out the coordinates
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
I am providing you one of the ways to do this, and there will be other methods and they may even prove to be much easier depending on the situation. The point I was trying to drive home is the concept behind scaling factor that may either be a dilation or compression.
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
in other cases, the scaling or dilation may not be from the origin and you might be asked to do it at a certain point. |dw:1437621950818:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
Are you familiar with this formula? A' = A*f
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
|dw:1437622134720:dw|
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
I do not use that formula, but I do know what that is. People write it differently, and all it boils down to is a multiplication or division from of a particular displacement.
anonymous
  • anonymous
My school gave me that formula, and that's what I used to get the coordinates that I posted earlier
anonymous
  • anonymous
Do u think they're correct? I'm pretty sure they are, but I'm still doubtful...
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
the concept has many applications which we do not have to memorize many formulas, we stick to basic ones. I will show you what I mean. |dw:1437622547410:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sorry... still don't get it...
anonymous
  • anonymous
What did u get for the new coordinates?
anonymous
  • anonymous
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
|dw:1437622635217:dw|
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
sorry, I am not going to answer your homework for you. If you really want the coordinates, you will have to understand the concept first and not focus so much on what formula you've been given. https://www.illustrativemathematics.org/content-standards/tasks/602
anonymous
  • anonymous
Hehe, sorry but the method you're giving me is pretty confusing...
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
|dw:1437623473525:dw|
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
|dw:1437624194984:dw|
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
|dw:1437624415102:dw|
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
you can use the formula your school gave you all you want, but that limits you from understanding what is going on because they did not even explain how they got that formula in the first place. My concern before was that it was not emphasized that the formula you have was not a restricted dilation from the origin (0,0)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ok, I'll try to work on it.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thnx!!!
nincompoop
  • nincompoop
The beauty of what I am trying to show you is that it uses what other math you're familiar with and utilizing them to solve other problems.

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