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anonymous

  • one year ago

A triangle has coordinates A (1, 5), B (-2, 1) and C (0, -4). What are the new coordinates if the triangle is dilated with a scale factor of 1/5 ?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @pooja195

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Do I use the formula A' = A*f?

  3. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437619623775:dw|

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    But do I use the formula that I mentioned?

  5. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    scale factor each length changes by factor to get the new length

  6. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    not sure what your formula represents

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    A' stands for the new point, A stands for the original point, and f stands for scale factor

  8. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    with my approach the lengths are changing AB BC and AC start at one location then change to find new coordinates

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The new coordinates I got are A = (1/5 , 1) ; B = (-2/5 , 1/5) ; C = (0, -4/5)

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @pooja195

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Could u help me out?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @SolomonZelman

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Are my new coordinates correct @SolomonZelman ?

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Hero

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Nnesha

  16. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    There are different ways of dilation, but the most common if you are not asked to do it otherwise is to obtain the distance from the point of origin (0,0) to the coordinates one-by-one and factor it. Here is an example.|dw:1437621122694:dw|

  17. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437621312440:dw|

  18. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437621423014:dw|

  19. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437621698705:dw|

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    But this doesn't give me the coordinates...

  21. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    it doesn't right away, but if you think about it, the distance formula is a derivation of the pythagorean theorem, which will allow you to work out the coordinates

  22. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    I am providing you one of the ways to do this, and there will be other methods and they may even prove to be much easier depending on the situation. The point I was trying to drive home is the concept behind scaling factor that may either be a dilation or compression.

  23. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    in other cases, the scaling or dilation may not be from the origin and you might be asked to do it at a certain point. |dw:1437621950818:dw|

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Are you familiar with this formula? A' = A*f

  25. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437622134720:dw|

  26. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    I do not use that formula, but I do know what that is. People write it differently, and all it boils down to is a multiplication or division from of a particular displacement.

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    My school gave me that formula, and that's what I used to get the coordinates that I posted earlier

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Do u think they're correct? I'm pretty sure they are, but I'm still doubtful...

  29. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    the concept has many applications which we do not have to memorize many formulas, we stick to basic ones. I will show you what I mean. |dw:1437622547410:dw|

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sorry... still don't get it...

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What did u get for the new coordinates?

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @nincompoop

  33. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437622635217:dw|

  34. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    sorry, I am not going to answer your homework for you. If you really want the coordinates, you will have to understand the concept first and not focus so much on what formula you've been given. https://www.illustrativemathematics.org/content-standards/tasks/602

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Hehe, sorry but the method you're giving me is pretty confusing...

  36. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437623473525:dw|

  37. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437624194984:dw|

  38. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437624415102:dw|

  39. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    you can use the formula your school gave you all you want, but that limits you from understanding what is going on because they did not even explain how they got that formula in the first place. My concern before was that it was not emphasized that the formula you have was not a restricted dilation from the origin (0,0)

  40. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok, I'll try to work on it.

  41. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thnx!!!

  42. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    The beauty of what I am trying to show you is that it uses what other math you're familiar with and utilizing them to solve other problems.

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