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anonymous

  • one year ago

Describe a situation in which the probability of two events is mutually exclusive. Formulate and answer a question about its probability. Repeat the process for inclusive events. Read your classmates' answers. How do they compare to yours? Did you come up with the same situation as anyone else? Do you agree or disagree with their vision of the situation? Why is it important to determine whether events are mutually exclusive?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @nincompoop @ganeshie8 @CGGURUMANJUNATH

  2. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Rolling an even number with a die and rolling an odd number with a die.

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @mathstudent55 would that be exclusive or inclusive?

  4. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    go back to the theory of probability

  5. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    mutually exclusive if there is a disjoint between two events

  6. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    let me provide an example

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @nincompoop so rolling die would be inclusive? Math isn't my strong area... neither are words, so if I don't make sense tell me lol

  8. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Mutually exclusive If you roll an even number, it is not odd ,and if you roll an odd number it is not even. Inclusive would be: roll a 3 or an odd number. Since 3 is odd, rolling a 3 or an odd number are not mutually exclusive events.

  9. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437725106189:dw|

  10. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    the same concept applies in every event.

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @nincompoop so if I go with rolling an even die and and odd die, they'd be mutually exclusive?

  12. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437725373642:dw|

  13. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    so the two dies are designed to only give you odd or even respectively?

  14. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    the die is a poor example to drive the concept home if you're learning a mutually exclusive events.

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Mutually exclusive events are events that cannot happen at the same. For example, a mutually exclusive event would flipping a coin and seeing if you get H or T. The formula to solve mutually exclusive probability is f(H)+f(H). Mutually inclusive events are events that can happen at the same time. For example, mutually inclusive events include rolling dice, to see if you get even or odd. The formula to solve mutually inclusive probability is d(e)+d(o)-d(e and o). Would this be a good answer?

  16. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437725754621:dw|

  17. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437725877499:dw|

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    inclusive...

  19. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    there you have it.

  20. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    *applauds*

  21. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    you must be able to provide an intersection of two sets (events) to be able to cite that they are inclusive. if no intersection occurs, which is null, then we say they are mutually exclusive or disjoint.

  22. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1437726151279:dw|