Why was the spread of Christianity to non-Jews significant? It helped Christianity emerge as a separate faith. It forced Christianity to evolve to meet followers’ needs. It stopped the persecution of Christians at the hands of Romans. It changed Christianity, as the religions encompassed different faiths. @kakes1967 @speartonion

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Why was the spread of Christianity to non-Jews significant? It helped Christianity emerge as a separate faith. It forced Christianity to evolve to meet followers’ needs. It stopped the persecution of Christians at the hands of Romans. It changed Christianity, as the religions encompassed different faiths. @kakes1967 @speartonion

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At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

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n a world dominated by Roman cruelty — where the majority of the world’s population was slaves or vassals to Rome; where the idea of human freedom (as we in the Western world know it) was unimaginable – if you spoke in terms of Jewish moral values, albeit minus the lifestyle that embodies it, you had a ready audience. If you said that slaves are as good as masters; that the poor as good as the rich; that the weak are as great as the mighty; and that God loves everyone; and that everyone could make it to eternity – people were going to listen. I read this story in the Bible not long ago here is a hint
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witch one is it ?
Christianity would grow to dominate Europe by the 5th century AD, but its humble beginnings can be traced to the adjacent continent of Asia, in a backwater of the Roman Empire known as Judea. It began as a small Jewish movement in and around Jerusalem, which purported that the Son of God (Jesus Christ - the "anointed one") had lived and preached among them during the early 1st century. Followers claimed that his new "gospel" (a.k.a. "the way") corrected the corruptions which had infiltrated Judaism throughout the previous centuries, showing the true way to salvation (by believing in and following the teachings of Jesus). Christianity first materialized as an offshoot of Judaism (i.e. "reformed Judaism"), centered around the Hebrew prophesies of a Jewish messiah. Just as Judaism was viewed primarily as a religion for the Israelites, Christianity was also initially viewed as a religion for "God's chosen people" (as the Israelites viewed themselves). This original understanding is reflected by various passages in the New Testament which ascribe to Jesus instruction that prohibits Jewish followers from introducing the gospel among the "gentiles" (i.e. non-Jews). The prevailing viewpoint among the earliest Christians was that the gospel was God's gift to the Jews, to help perfect them as a people, to escape their captors (the Romans in this case), and to help usher the Kingdom of Heaven to the earth, which was to be located in Jerusalem with Jesus at its throne. According to New Testament writings, the apostle Peter understood that the gospel was to be confined to the Jews. However, Paul of Tarsus would enter the scene, and successfully challenge this notion, marking an important transitional point for Christianity.
i will go for option C....
My paragraph was referring to C.
thank you

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