anonymous
  • anonymous
According to Christian beliefs, Jesus was sent to Earth to to promote peace and love to save mankind from sin to inspire belief in God to unify people of the world @jack_prism God @cbarredo1
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chestercat
  • chestercat
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
CBARREDO1
  • CBARREDO1
To save mankind from sin
paki
  • paki
@CBARREDO1 please avoid posting DIRECT answers... @pooja195 @jagr2713
CBARREDO1
  • CBARREDO1
It doesn't make sense, The bible says that he atoned for our sins

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Nvm i see what your talking about sorry
IrishBoy123
  • IrishBoy123
in the buybull itself JC claims to establish the New Covenant and fulfill the old. So in that sense he is claiming to be the Messiah, though a very Greek style of messiah [St Paul made most of that sChristology stuff up as he went along] and very unlike the next Davidian military king that the Jews so wanted to get rid of the Romans. so he was sent to ...... fulfill some old baloney prophesy that he didn't actually fulfill then you have the redemption theme mentioned above, by dying on the Cross JC is said atoned for our sins because everyone is born a sinner (lol!!! little new born babies are sinners] and the original sin, concipusence, that caused Adam and Eve and the **talking** snake [lol] to behave so badly in the garden of eden!! but it's all allegorical now, isn't it ;-) so JC's dad, who is also JC because they are one and the same and co-eternal, though one is "begotten" from the other [how does that all make sense?!?!] designed sub-optimal humans because they sinned [aka knew how to have a laugh]; then, without asking us, sent his co-eternal son who is also God to die, even though JC didn't really die because he ascended into Heaven. apparently. with that as background, we can go through your list and see if we can find the best answer: A. to promote peace and love OK, when people actually believed in this stuff, pretty much all wars were about religion or had religion at their core. now no-one really believes that nonsense anymore, we are having to deal with other religions that are 600 years behind us in terms of wising up and in terms of their fundamentalism. so can't be that. they would of course have found something else to fight about had there not been religion but that is another matter. B. to save mankind from sin assuming JC's dad did a terrible job in making us -- which runs contrary to the idea that Gid is prefection -- well let's look at the homophobia and misogeny and other bad stuff that the Christian religion has historically promoted. and the wars. C. to inspire belief in God i'd like to say this one. but we're talking Bronze Age so people worshipped just about anything they didn't understand which was most things. Source: The Life of Brian D. to unify people of the world Ahem, yes. Moving quickly on.... i'd go for A because it sounds the nicest and Christianty usually try to trademark such notions.....even though they are in our DNA.

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