A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • one year ago

If f(x)= x+1^-1 and g(x)=x-2 , what is the domain of f(x) divided by g(x)

  • This Question is Closed
  1. carolinar7
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    what do you think

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    honestly I don't know, I want to say all values of x but im not sure :(

  3. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Can you write out \(\dfrac{f(x)}{g(x)}\)

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no I don't know how sorry

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    can you guys help me pleaseeee

  6. hybrik
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    x+1^-1, So your saying the whole quantity by -1, or just "1"

  7. carolinar7
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\frac{ x+1 }{ x-2 }\]

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah the exponent is -1

  9. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    its the inverse \((x+1)^{-1}=\dfrac{1}{x+1}\)

  10. carolinar7
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no

  11. carolinar7
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The exponent is only on 1 not (x+1)

  12. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    So you have \(\dfrac{(x+1)^{-1}}{x-2}=\dfrac{1}{(x+1)(x-2)}\). Now what numbers force us to divide by \(0\)?

  13. carolinar7
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[Did she mean (x+1)^{-1}\]

  14. hybrik
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The zeroes of (x+1)(x-2)

  15. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yes. there is no reason to raise something to 1

  16. hybrik
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Also known as (x+1)=0, (x-2)=0, Solve for X on both of them @idgm_idontgetmath

  17. carolinar7
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    x=-1,2

  18. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    please let them figure something out man. you are not helping if you give thm everything....

  19. hybrik
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    But im trying to show him to solve zeroes??????

  20. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Not you.

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @carolinar7

    1 Attachment
  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @vera_ewing

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @juanpabloJR

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @campbell_st can you help?

  25. campbell_st
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ok... here is what I'll do, if you are happy that \[\frac{f(x)}{g(x)} = \frac{1}{(x +1)(x-2)}\] you need to solve x + 1 = 0 and x - 2 = 0 can you do that

  26. campbell_st
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    so here is an image of f(x)/g(x)

    1 Attachment
  27. campbell_st
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    the curve continues to the left.. to- infinity and to the right to infinity however the solutions to x + 1 = 0 and x -2 = 0 create vertical asymptotes... this is where the cruve doesn't exist but you can see that the curve exists between the asymptotes so there are 3 regions where the curve exists or can be drawn...

  28. campbell_st
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    so the regions start with - infinity to the 1st asymptote between the asymptotes and the right asymptote to infinity... this will be the domain

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    If im understanding right the solution is B then

  30. campbell_st
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    that's correct

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    awww thanks

  32. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.