anonymous
  • anonymous
If the earth´s tides increased , what would be the most likely explanation?
Biology
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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CBARREDO1
  • CBARREDO1
Tides would be greater if the Earth's diameter were greater
anonymous
  • anonymous
Define "increased". Are we talking increased in intensity or merely frequency?
thomaster
  • thomaster
These kinda questions belong in the earth science group. Biology is about the living things :)

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anonymous
  • anonymous
@thomaster That is not really true. Introductory Biology covers a lot of chemistry and quite a few physic concepts as well. Not to mention all the abiotic factors that one needs to know to understand phenology of organisms.
thomaster
  • thomaster
@mrdoldum The tides are covered in the hydrosphere and geology (celestial bodies such as the moon) within earth science. Chemistry, physics and abiotic factors underpin all biology, that's why they are covered in introductory biology. But it is not a part of the study itself. The case here is that this question would fit better in earth science, not that big of a deal, I was just pointing that out :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
@thomaster While I agree that in this case an Earth science field would be better, I would not want to in anyway discourage posting of chemistry, physics, and math questions in here as all will be covered in many Biology courses. You are very wrong about it not being part of Biology itself though. The simple fact is that without the other fields no knowledge you would get virtually nowhere in any field of Biology. The are absolutely integral to Biology. There would be no understanding without them.
thomaster
  • thomaster
Yes, like I said, they underpin biology. But there is a reason why chemistry and biology are different subjects even though they overlap in many ways right? Anyways my comment was purely to point out better positioning of questions in the different sections. Let's not turn this into a discussion about what is part of biology and what is not :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
I agree, on the last point that is. And back to the tides; it really does matter @reinav24. Increased intensity is best explained by something different than simple increased frequency.

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