A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • one year ago

If the earth´s tides increased , what would be the most likely explanation?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. CBARREDO1
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Tides would be greater if the Earth's diameter were greater

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Define "increased". Are we talking increased in intensity or merely frequency?

  3. thomaster
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    These kinda questions belong in the earth science group. Biology is about the living things :)

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @thomaster That is not really true. Introductory Biology covers a lot of chemistry and quite a few physic concepts as well. Not to mention all the abiotic factors that one needs to know to understand phenology of organisms.

  5. thomaster
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @mrdoldum The tides are covered in the hydrosphere and geology (celestial bodies such as the moon) within earth science. Chemistry, physics and abiotic factors underpin all biology, that's why they are covered in introductory biology. But it is not a part of the study itself. The case here is that this question would fit better in earth science, not that big of a deal, I was just pointing that out :)

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @thomaster While I agree that in this case an Earth science field would be better, I would not want to in anyway discourage posting of chemistry, physics, and math questions in here as all will be covered in many Biology courses. You are very wrong about it not being part of Biology itself though. The simple fact is that without the other fields no knowledge you would get virtually nowhere in any field of Biology. The are absolutely integral to Biology. There would be no understanding without them.

  7. thomaster
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yes, like I said, they underpin biology. But there is a reason why chemistry and biology are different subjects even though they overlap in many ways right? Anyways my comment was purely to point out better positioning of questions in the different sections. Let's not turn this into a discussion about what is part of biology and what is not :)

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I agree, on the last point that is. And back to the tides; it really does matter @reinav24. Increased intensity is best explained by something different than simple increased frequency.

  9. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.