anonymous
  • anonymous
If f(x) = x2 – 1 and g(x) = 2x – 3, what is the domain of (f*g)(x)
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
you are multiplying a polynomial times another polynomial. This will give you a polynomial as well.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
You know what polynomial is, correct?

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
Ok, will you agree with me (if you don't understand why it is so, then ask! but will you agree) that a polynomial is DEFINED for ALL values of x?
anonymous
  • anonymous
why is it so? haha
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
Ok, i will post a percise and short definition of a polynomial. "Polynomial" is a function that can have the terms of: 1) Constants (some real numbers) 2) x raised to a power of 1, 2, 3 and on (but the power has to be a whole number) (and the terms can have any real coefficients)
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
i will do some examples
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
polynomials. examples. y=0 y=-45 y=√3 (or any function y=c where c is a constant) y=-4x y=3x+2 y=x-9 (or any function in a form of y=mx or y=mx+b) y=3x² y=-5x²+9 y=x²+8 y=x²-7x-7 and so on....
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok im pretty sure i get it
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
it (a polynomial) terms can be made up and can consist of any terms as long as the terms have x^(whole number) and other real numbers ok got the definition
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
So, really try to think of any polynomial that can have an UNDEFINED X-VALUE. what I mean by "UNDEFINED X-VALUE" is that if you plug this value for x into the function, then you will get an undefined/indeterminate output for y in polynomials this "UNDEFINED X-VALUE" never exists
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
Because if your x's have only whole number powers such as: x\(^1\), x\(^2\), x\(^3\), x\(^4\) then you will get a valid result NO MATTER WHAT you plug in for x.
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay makes sense
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
now agin, when you multiply two functions where both of these functions are polynomials (i.e. whole number powers of x like 1, 2, 3 and on with or without constants) then you get after multiplying these two (or any number of) polynomial functions - you will get - a polynomial function (whole number powers of x like 1, 2, 3 and on with or without constants)
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
polynomial • polynomial = polynomial it is good to remember, even if you don't fully comprehend the deepness behind it (you will get it at some time)
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
now, if your function f(x)=x²-1 and g(x)=2x-3 polynomial?
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
are the polynomials?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
they are
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
so the product of them (when you multiply f • g) will also give you a what?
anonymous
  • anonymous
polynomial
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
yes.
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
And again, ANY POLYNOMIAL has a domain of ALL VALUES OF X. (in interval notation: Domain: (-∞, +∞) )
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
So will what be the domain of your new function be? (we know your new function is going to be a polynomial -as we said b4)
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
if you got questions, you can always ask ....
anonymous
  • anonymous
im following as of right now :)
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
we know your function is a polynomial (correct?) So can you give me the domain of your new function, or not yet?
anonymous
  • anonymous
(-∞, +∞)?
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
yes
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
the ∞ (or +∞) symbol means infinity and -∞ means negative infinity --> (same stength but going the negative way)
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay i remember that one
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
(-∞, +∞) means from negative infinity to positive infinity and that is: every single number that there can possible be
anonymous
  • anonymous
i wish you were my math teacher haha
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
that is the domain of your new polynomail function, or of any polynomial function.....
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
i am just some 19 yrs old dude....
anonymous
  • anonymous
YOUR ONLY 19!!!!
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
Math is just something I like:) In any case, do you have questions regarding this question?
anonymous
  • anonymous
nope i got it :) ty so much
SolomonZelman
  • SolomonZelman
k, yw

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.