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anonymous

  • one year ago

Use the triangle at the right. Find the length of the missing side. Show your work Did i do the first one right? I don't want to do the second one wrong too. 1.a = 16, b = 63 2. b = 2.1, c = 2.9 16^2 =256, 63^2=3,969 256+3969 = 4225 now we need to find the square root by separating the 4225 into two separate numbers square root of 42 is 6 now find the largest root in 42. Which is 36. 6*6 = 36 and the square of 25 is 5 add the roots This give me the answer for c length. 6 and 5 is 65. a=256 b=3969 and c = 65

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  1. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    Do you have a picture or other description of the triangle you are dealing with in problem 1 and/or problem 2?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yup you need a picture

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The picture probably wouldn't help it's just a right triangle but okay

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  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @SolomonZelman

  5. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    this picture will definitely help, because I would have thought that b is the hypotenuse

  6. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    i mean in question 1 i would have thought so, but this picture gives me that c=hypotenuse in both cases, and I know it is a right triangle

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Alright.

  8. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    I want to correct you though. The set up is a little different, that is 1. Here is the rule. A right triangle with sides a, b, c (where the hypotenuse is side c), must satisfy the following statement: a²+b²=c²

  9. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    this statement is known as the pythagorean theorem.

  10. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    Now, you are given your two smaller legs a and b are 16 and 63 (respectively). And you are missing the hypotenuse, so this is what you would do. (16)² + (63)² = c²

  11. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    then you simplify the left hand side, and solve for c (just by talking the square root of both sides)

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So i had to square c?

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Take the square root of a and b?

  14. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    (16)² + (63)² = c² 4225 = c² then do this: \(\sqrt{4225}\) = \(\sqrt{{\rm c}^2}\)

  15. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    this way you are able to solve for c. (normally the square root will give you the ±, as you know, but in this case since distance or sidelength can not be negative, you diregard any negative solutions)

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Alright. is c 65? @SolomonZelman

  17. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    yes

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Did i do the problem right?

  19. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    i wrote it all out and still doesn't take that much space and time..... ok, now question 2...

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Kay.

  21. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    oh, I deleted that.... ------------------ a²+b²=c² 16²+63²=c² 4225=c² √4225 = √c² c=65 ------------ reposted it.

  22. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    ok, in question 2, you are given c=2.9 b=2.1

  23. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    can you plug in this information into the a²+b²=c² ?

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sure a^2+ b^2=c^2

  25. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    but, you are given the c and b, so you can g ahead and plug in 2.9 for c, and 2.1 for b.

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    2.9^2 + 2.1^2

  27. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    no,

  28. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    The pythagorean theorem is: a²+b²=c² where c is the hypotenuse and a & b are two legs. you are given that your c (which is hypotenuse as well) is 2.9 and you are given that your b is 2.1 (your missing side is a)

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Alright

  30. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    please take a shot to plug in your values (into a²+b²=c²)

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    2.9^+2.1=c^2

  32. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    your c is given, but a is not

  33. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    it is like this: a² + (2.1)² = (2.9)²

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh sorry.

  35. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    it's ok...

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    2.9^+2.1=c^2

  37. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    a² + (2.1)² = (2.9)²

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Wifi is bad okay a^2 +(2.1)^2 =( 2.9)^2

  39. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    because you are given: c=2.9 b=2.1 so, the missing side is a. Our theorem is: a² + b² = c² so lets plug in everything plugging 2.9 for c plugging 2.1 for b you get: a² + (2.1)² = (2.9)²

  40. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    ok now solve for a

  41. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Alright one moment

  42. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Do i add the c value or divide or do it the same thing i did in my last problem.

  43. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @SolomonZelman you there?

  44. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    you first calculate the values of (2.1)² and (2.9)²

  45. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Alright.

  46. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    4.41= 8.41. Do i subtract next?

  47. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    a² + (2.1)² = (2.9)² without a calculator: 21•20=420 21•21=420+21=441 so 2.1² = 4.41 30•30=900 30•29=900-30=870 29•29=870-29=841 so 2.9²=8.41

  48. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    just demonstrating another technique.

  49. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    anyway a² + (2.1)² = (2.9)² a² + 4.41 = 8.41 yes you subtract 4.41 from both sides

  50. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay.

  51. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    a² + 4.41 \(\small \color{red}{-4.41}\)= 8.41\(\small \color{red}{-4.41}\)

  52. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    and from this u get?

  53. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    4.00

  54. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    yes, or just 4 :)

  55. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    so, a²=4 correct?

  56. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yeah it looks correct i don't think it can be factored anymore

  57. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    no, there is no factoring here:) so we got a²=4 what do you think your next (and final) step is?

  58. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    putting them together like 2.1^2+2.9^2= 4^2

  59. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    u just take the square root of both sides \(a^2=4\) \(\color{red}{\sqrt{\color{black}{a^2}}}=\color{red}{\sqrt{\color{black}{4} }}\)

  60. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    a = ?

  61. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    4^2?

  62. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    a square root of a 4 is?

  63. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    2?

  64. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    yes so a=2

  65. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Alright is there anything else?

  66. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    no, you found the missing side in both of the problems.

  67. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Alright thanks for your help :)

  68. SolomonZelman
    • one year ago
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    yw

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