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Photon336

  • one year ago

Chem question

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  1. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    IMF question

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  2. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Question on vapor pressure

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  3. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Condensation: dealing with kinetic/potential energy

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  4. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @Rushwr @taramgrant0543664 @Empty

  5. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    I'm thinking D, D and then C I think I have it in the right order

  6. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    condensation is \[(g) \rightarrow (l)\] So i thought kinetic energy would have to go down. for the second one

  7. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    For the 1st one I'll go with B

  8. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @Rushwr why not D? can you explain..

  9. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    not saying you're wrong

  10. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    Yep sorry kinetic energy does decrease

  11. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    cuz HCl has dipole dipole interactions

  12. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    ok so for the first one it is B

  13. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    for the second one I'll go with D or b

  14. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    not sure though

  15. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438060894240:dw| isn't this covalent bonding?

  16. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Non polar covalent?

  17. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    it is but they have asked us for the intermolecular interaction not the bonding type right?

  18. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    C2H6 is covalent bonding

  19. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    oh yeah... true !

  20. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    wouldn't that be london dispersion forces/ vanderwalls forces for c2H4?

  21. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    for the last question I'll go with D

  22. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    I'm pretty sure D is right for that last one

  23. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    yes that is london dispersion forces @Photon336

  24. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Yeah I think the last one is D. let me check

  25. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    oh.. wait.. it's E whaaat...

  26. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @Empty thoughts?

  27. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Phase change, is an equilibrium process so i'm going to make a stretch and say that at an equilibrium process temperature = constant so KE stays the same. (don't quote me on that)

  28. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    I can't explain why Potential energy decreases.

  29. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    FYI If you want to see the rest of the questions i attached them here,

  30. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    Condensation is gas to liquid so you're creating order and energy decreases

  31. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    OK, but the way though of it was that if kinetic energy goes down then PE has go up KE + PE + Wf = Mechanical energy. don't know thinking that they have to be conserved. (but i'm working backwards from the answer) the say PE went down. I guess we can go on to the second question about vapor pressure. I attached the PDF to the conversation.

  32. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    maybe it's like this. When a liquid is condensed all he molecules pack in to a smaller volume right? So heat is given out. That heat is given out by the potential energy having the kinetic energy unchanged.

  33. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    something like that would do right?

  34. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    Yes it would

  35. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    forcing something into a smaller volume would imply a decrease in entropy

  36. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    But i wonder if that's the case during any phase change

  37. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    b/c a phase change is an equilibrium process, where t is constant, but i think that's probably the best way to explain it.. so the heat is released by the (total potential energy) going down, leaving KE unchanged?

  38. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    Sounds pretty good to me. I'm going to bed now so good night enjoy the rest of the question and I'll check in again with this tomorrow!

  39. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    will post one more question after this then I g2g

  40. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    I'm not sure about the vapor pressure question @Empty thoughts?

  41. Empty
    • one year ago
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    Hmmm Yeah I was a bit confused by this as well I was almost sure it was D but I was also fairly certain potential energy decreased as well since the distances between particles should be less as they start to bond to each other slightly. I guess I need to go look at vapor pressure and all this I'm sort of rusty I guess.

  42. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    I'm going to re-post the vapor pressure question tomorrow

  43. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    so as you go from say (s) to liquid the kinetic energy increases but PE decreases right?

  44. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    We didn't get to the vapor pressure question

  45. sweetburger
    • one year ago
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    Ok so for im assuming question 7 that you posted about the vapor pressure. I am going with answer choice d. Both I and III are correct but II increasing the volume wouldn't have any affect on the vapor pressure.

  46. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    7 was A. but i'm not sure as to why though. @sweetburger equilibrium vapor pressure. like I knew increasing temperature, increases vapor pressure, but isn't the equilibrium vapor pressure = external pressure/ boiling point? NOT sure. I "guess" equilibrium = temperature dependent, so if you heat up or cool down something equilibrium will change/shift

  47. sweetburger
    • one year ago
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    I understand how heat affects the equilibrium, but I also thought that pressure would have an affect but thinking about it now If the pressure was increased above the surface there would be no true affect on the number of molecules coming out and the number going back in.

  48. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Only other thing would be if you changed the external pressure ..

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