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anonymous

  • one year ago

MEDAL! to first person to help me. help needed. question is in the comment box

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  2. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    A vertical shift adds/subtracts a constant to/from every y-coordinate while leaving the x-coordinate unchanged so our functions are either going up + sign or going down - sign if we have a horizontal shift we are either going left f(x+k) left k units or right f(x-k) right k units

  3. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    there that should be the right graph

  4. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    I've noticed something... while the shifts are different for the equation (g(x) is going up, and f(x) is going down) we have either a stretch or shrink depending on the number at the beginning of the function

  5. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    for the f(x) function we have 1/2 if we have 0<x<1 it's compressed (shrink) for g(x) we have 1.5 or 3/2 for a number x>1 it stretches in the y-direction

  6. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    so this is the original f(x) function and the graphs where the transformations are applied

  7. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    and here we have the g(x) and its transformations so .. since we have 1/2 for f(x) and we have 3/2 for g(x) one of the graphs is shrinking and one is stretching.. not the same in that department either

  8. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    I think it has something to do with the shifts that contain the parenthesis. I'm going to include the graphs with the ORIGINAL function (there were 3 graph transformations total). so all together f(x) and g(x) have four separate graphs

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so A it stretches.

  10. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    one graph stretches and the other one shrinks.. so it's not the same one graph goes up and the other one goes down ... not the same either the shifts inside the () is what they have in common

  11. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    In function graphing, a horizontal translation is a transformation which results in a graph that is equivalent to shifting the base graph left or right in the direction of the x-axis.

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ooh oke. c: thanks!

  13. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    yes :) because I've noticed that there is a x-2 and x -7 and although one graph shifts 2 units to the right and the other graph shifts 7 units to the right, both of those graphs are going to the right. :)

  14. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    (x-2), (x-7)

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spraguer (Moderator)
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is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

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