anonymous
  • anonymous
What is 1 1/2 x3
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
it is \[\huge 1\tfrac{1}{2}\times 3\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
do you know how to write \[\huge 1\tfrac{1}{2}\] as an "improper fraction"? that is the first step

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More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
a little
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
so first we have do deal with the 1 x 2 portion so what's 1 x 2 ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I got 3/2
anonymous
  • anonymous
good
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
correct.
anonymous
  • anonymous
then \[\frac{3}{2}\times 3\] completes it
anonymous
  • anonymous
remember "multiply" means multiply in the numerator (top) so \[\frac{3}{2}\times 3=\frac{3\times 3}{2}\]
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
\[\LARGE \frac{3}{2} \times 3 \] now all we have to do is to multiply \[\LARGE \frac{2}{2}\] to 3 so we can have fractions with the same numerator x.x
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh no!!!
anonymous
  • anonymous
i got 6
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
what?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@UsukiDoll c'mon! you know you do not need a common denominator to multiply fractions !!!
anonymous
  • anonymous
I also got 18
anonymous
  • anonymous
lets go slow
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
nugh. this guy -_-
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
sigh.. let me guess change 3/2 into a decimal and then multiply by 3 ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
no no just multiply
anonymous
  • anonymous
we are at this step \[\frac{3}{2}\times 3\] right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
6
anonymous
  • anonymous
there is no 6 in it
anonymous
  • anonymous
i multiplied and got 6
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\frac{3}{2}\times 3=\frac{3\times 3}{2}\] where does the 6 come from?
anonymous
  • anonymous
then I multiplied and got 18
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
wait a sec. re-write this a bit. to what sat wrote
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay
anonymous
  • anonymous
in the numerator (top) you have \(3\times 3\) which is ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
9
anonymous
  • anonymous
right
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
so the numerator is 9 and the denominator is 2 which is 9/2
anonymous
  • anonymous
and in the denominator you have just the 2
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay
anonymous
  • anonymous
giving you \[\frac{9}{2}\] which you should probably then write as a mixed number since you started with mixed numbers
anonymous
  • anonymous
4 1/2
anonymous
  • anonymous
at the risk of repeating myself you do NOT find a common denominator when multiplying that is for addition or subtraction multiply means multiply, that is all
anonymous
  • anonymous
right
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
wow are you kidding me right now sat? \[\large \frac{3}{2} \times 3 \cdot \frac{2}{2}\] \[\large \frac{3 \times 6}{4} \rightarrow \frac{18}{4} \rightarrow \frac{9}{2}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
that is \[\huge 4\tfrac{1}{2}\] is correct
anonymous
  • anonymous
@UsukiDoll you must be kidding me right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
no. even with finding the common denominator we can still get the same result -_-
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\frac{3}{2}\times 3\times\frac{100}{100}=\frac{3\times 300}{200}=4\tfrac{1}{2}\]
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
heck if I was given that option to do it that way, pfffffffft so be it XD
anonymous
  • anonymous
you are doing nothing but confusing the issue you can get an equivalent fraction for 3 by multiplying top and bottom by any number you choose, but you do not do that when multiplying
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
no I'm not. I'm making it easier by having common denominators all over the place, so I can simplify the numerator... combine the denominator and then reduce.
anonymous
  • anonymous
let me repeat myself you do NOT find a common denominator when multiplying you need that only for addition and subtraction multiply means multiply
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\frac{a}{b}\times \frac{c}{d}=\frac{ac}{bd}\] that is all
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
ahahaha you just did fractions XD
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes of course
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\frac{a}{b}\times c=\frac{ac}{b}\] also fractions
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
\[\frac{a}{b}\times \frac{c}{d}=\frac{ac}{bd} \] this is better.
anonymous
  • anonymous
they are the same, only in the second case \[\frac{a}{b}\times c\] you have \(d=1\) no common denominator needed
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
exactly sat .. still using fractions XD
anonymous
  • anonymous
let me ask you @UsukiDoll do you really build up fractions when multiplying? how would you compute \[\frac{52}{17}\times 5\]?
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
\[\frac{52}{17}\times 5 \cdot \frac{17}{17}\] \[\frac{52}{17} \times \frac{85}{17} \rightarrow \frac{4420}{289} \]
anonymous
  • anonymous
at least you are being consistent!
anonymous
  • anonymous
some times people have different methods that still give you the same answer
anonymous
  • anonymous
why not \[\frac{52}{17}\times 5 \cdot \frac{23}{23}\]? that will work as well
Loser66
  • Loser66
@UsukiDoll is it right?\(3=\dfrac{3}{1}\)? why do we have the common denominator on multiplication ?
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
so agree with @Aliypop
misty1212
  • misty1212
i like \[\frac{52}{17}\times 5 \cdot \frac{1712}{1712}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
so the answer is 52/17
misty1212
  • misty1212
\[\frac{52}{17}\times 5=\frac{52\times 5}{17}\]
misty1212
  • misty1212
so your real job is to compute \(52\times 5\) don't mess with mr 17
anonymous
  • anonymous
don't mess with mister inbetween?
anonymous
  • anonymous
so would I multiply
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
that's just some example fraction that they threw at me. the real answer is already done. Honestly that's what I was taught in elementary school and it worked well. NO one is going to force me to use whatever kind of jumbo shrimp thing they throw out there. If it worked millions of times, I'm not going to change it!
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
P.S \[ \frac{4420}{289} = 15.29\] \[\frac{52}{17}\times 5 = 3.058 \times 5 = 15.29\] oh look ! The same decimal value regardless of method. nughhhhhh. . . sorry for ranting but that had gone too far.
anonymous
  • anonymous
thank for so much for helping me @UsukiDoll
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
you're welcome @Aliypop :) It's after 4 am... I better get some sleep.
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay
UsukiDoll
  • UsukiDoll
night everyone.

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