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anonymous

  • one year ago

What is 1 1/2 x3

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    it is \[\huge 1\tfrac{1}{2}\times 3\]

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    do you know how to write \[\huge 1\tfrac{1}{2}\] as an "improper fraction"? that is the first step

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    a little

  5. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    so first we have do deal with the 1 x 2 portion so what's 1 x 2 ?

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I got 3/2

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    good

  8. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    correct.

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    then \[\frac{3}{2}\times 3\] completes it

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    remember "multiply" means multiply in the numerator (top) so \[\frac{3}{2}\times 3=\frac{3\times 3}{2}\]

  11. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    \[\LARGE \frac{3}{2} \times 3 \] now all we have to do is to multiply \[\LARGE \frac{2}{2}\] to 3 so we can have fractions with the same numerator x.x

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh no!!!

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i got 6

  14. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    what?

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @UsukiDoll c'mon! you know you do not need a common denominator to multiply fractions !!!

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I also got 18

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    lets go slow

  18. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    nugh. this guy -_-

  19. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    sigh.. let me guess change 3/2 into a decimal and then multiply by 3 ?

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no no just multiply

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    we are at this step \[\frac{3}{2}\times 3\] right?

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    6

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    there is no 6 in it

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i multiplied and got 6

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{3}{2}\times 3=\frac{3\times 3}{2}\] where does the 6 come from?

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    then I multiplied and got 18

  27. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    wait a sec. re-write this a bit. to what sat wrote

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    in the numerator (top) you have \(3\times 3\) which is ?

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    9

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    right

  32. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    so the numerator is 9 and the denominator is 2 which is 9/2

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    and in the denominator you have just the 2

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    giving you \[\frac{9}{2}\] which you should probably then write as a mixed number since you started with mixed numbers

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    4 1/2

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    at the risk of repeating myself you do NOT find a common denominator when multiplying that is for addition or subtraction multiply means multiply, that is all

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    right

  39. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    wow are you kidding me right now sat? \[\large \frac{3}{2} \times 3 \cdot \frac{2}{2}\] \[\large \frac{3 \times 6}{4} \rightarrow \frac{18}{4} \rightarrow \frac{9}{2}\]

  40. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    that is \[\huge 4\tfrac{1}{2}\] is correct

  41. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @UsukiDoll you must be kidding me right?

  42. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay

  43. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    no. even with finding the common denominator we can still get the same result -_-

  44. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{3}{2}\times 3\times\frac{100}{100}=\frac{3\times 300}{200}=4\tfrac{1}{2}\]

  45. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    heck if I was given that option to do it that way, pfffffffft so be it XD

  46. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    you are doing nothing but confusing the issue you can get an equivalent fraction for 3 by multiplying top and bottom by any number you choose, but you do not do that when multiplying

  47. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    no I'm not. I'm making it easier by having common denominators all over the place, so I can simplify the numerator... combine the denominator and then reduce.

  48. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    let me repeat myself you do NOT find a common denominator when multiplying you need that only for addition and subtraction multiply means multiply

  49. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{a}{b}\times \frac{c}{d}=\frac{ac}{bd}\] that is all

  50. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    ahahaha you just did fractions XD

  51. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes of course

  52. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{a}{b}\times c=\frac{ac}{b}\] also fractions

  53. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{a}{b}\times \frac{c}{d}=\frac{ac}{bd} \] this is better.

  54. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    they are the same, only in the second case \[\frac{a}{b}\times c\] you have \(d=1\) no common denominator needed

  55. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay

  56. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    exactly sat .. still using fractions XD

  57. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    let me ask you @UsukiDoll do you really build up fractions when multiplying? how would you compute \[\frac{52}{17}\times 5\]?

  58. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{52}{17}\times 5 \cdot \frac{17}{17}\] \[\frac{52}{17} \times \frac{85}{17} \rightarrow \frac{4420}{289} \]

  59. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    at least you are being consistent!

  60. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    some times people have different methods that still give you the same answer

  61. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    why not \[\frac{52}{17}\times 5 \cdot \frac{23}{23}\]? that will work as well

  62. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    @UsukiDoll is it right?\(3=\dfrac{3}{1}\)? why do we have the common denominator on multiplication ?

  63. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    so agree with @Aliypop

  64. misty1212
    • one year ago
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    i like \[\frac{52}{17}\times 5 \cdot \frac{1712}{1712}\]

  65. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so the answer is 52/17

  66. misty1212
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{52}{17}\times 5=\frac{52\times 5}{17}\]

  67. misty1212
    • one year ago
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    so your real job is to compute \(52\times 5\) don't mess with mr 17

  68. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    don't mess with mister inbetween?

  69. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so would I multiply

  70. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    that's just some example fraction that they threw at me. the real answer is already done. Honestly that's what I was taught in elementary school and it worked well. NO one is going to force me to use whatever kind of jumbo shrimp thing they throw out there. If it worked millions of times, I'm not going to change it!

  71. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    P.S \[ \frac{4420}{289} = 15.29\] \[\frac{52}{17}\times 5 = 3.058 \times 5 = 15.29\] oh look ! The same decimal value regardless of method. nughhhhhh. . . sorry for ranting but that had gone too far.

  72. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thank for so much for helping me @UsukiDoll

  73. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    you're welcome @Aliypop :) It's after 4 am... I better get some sleep.

  74. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay

  75. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    night everyone.

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