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anonymous

  • one year ago

The following diagram shows a _________________ tide. spring neap normal diurnal

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @sammixboo @AaronAndyson @undeadknight26 @jasmineETTA @Emi248 @uybuyvf @Tashiya_Pandas @welshfella @Mertsj @OregonDuck @batman19991 @batman19991 @batman19991 @batman19991 ;)

  3. Ibbutibbu.
    • one year ago
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    This is a spring tide, do you want me to tell you how, or you got it?

  4. OregonDuck
    • one year ago
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    spring tide

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Please tell me how @Ibbutibbu.

  6. Ibbutibbu.
    • one year ago
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    ok

  7. Ibbutibbu.
    • one year ago
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    "During full or new moons—which occur when the Earth, sun, and moon are nearly in alignment—average tidal ranges are slightly larger. This occurs twice each month. The moon appears new (dark) when it is directly between the Earth and the sun. The moon appears full when the Earth is between the moon and the sun. In both cases, the gravitational pull of the sun is "added" to the gravitational pull of the moon on Earth, causing the oceans to bulge a bit more than usual. This means that high tides are a little higher and low tides are a little lower than average. These are called spring tides, a common historical term that has nothing to do with the season of spring. Rather, the term is derived from the concept of the tide "springing forth." Spring tides occur twice each lunar month all year long, without regard to the season." --- http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/

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