Help please !

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At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

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What kinda help?
No thanks @saseal. I just want @beckyg111 to help me. But thanks :)
@sasael can you plz help her/him
No, I want you to help me. Your the only one I trust :)
@beckyg111 please :)
@beckyg111 aye aye
ill be fast :)
soooo? can you please help me quick? :) @beckyg111
@geny55 how bout you do your work and i'll check it for you?
ok sounds good, but its an exam
what did you get on the 4.00 pretest?
math?
no language arts
oh
68.75 ....
what did you get?
an F?
like a c i think
Oh okay, can you help me with that test please?
idk i can check your work but right now im on a question i need hep on
take the test i'll check your work
Ok but I'm almost done with the test. Just stay in my question please :)
1. Making the Most of Mucus Just the name itself will make you giggle. It's a great word that conjures visions of slime and unpleasantness. It is perhaps the most annoying part of having a cold or allergies. Mucus, however, plays a very important role in defense of our bodies and our health. In fact, it's high time mucus got a lot more respect. First, there are some amazing facts about mucus that are worthy of respect. Humans produce about a liter of mucus every day, whether they are sick or not. Bony fish and some invertebrates (snails or slugs) also have mucus cells on the outside of their body. This external mucus creates a protective coating that prevents predators' toxins from doing harm. Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems. We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong. We usually only see it when we are sick, and so we tend to dislike it. According to Michael M. Johns, III, MD, however, "mucus is incredibly important for our bodies." Johns, an assistant professor at Emory University, calls mucus "the oil in the engine" of our bodies. Without mucus, our engines, or bodies, would freeze up and stop working properly. Furthermore, mucus is not just the nasty gunk you see when you are sick. It lines the tissues in your mouth, your nose, throat, and lungs. It also is crucial in protecting your digestive system. Mucus puts a protective coating over the surfaces of these tissues, keeping them moist. Most of the time we don't notice mucus is making our lives better. It does its job quietly, making everything run smoothly, keeping our inner tissues soft and flexible enough to fight off invaders. Occasionally, though our mucus-making membranes go into overdrive. If you eat a hot pepper, your mucus membranes in your mouth and throat start producing extra mucus to protect you. If you come into contact with pollen, you may get a runny nose and start sneezing and coughing. When these things happen, your mucus systems start making more fluids to wash away the irritating particles. Mucus also has some antibodies that increase our ability to fight off bacteria and viruses. It's hard to appreciate what is essentially slime, but we have mucus for some very good reasons. It helps to keep us healthy and lets us know when our bodies are under attack. We would be wise to respect what our bodies do to keep us safe. So the next time you find yourself reaching for a tissue, remember mucus is your friend and ally. Which line from the text explains people’s attitude about mucus? If you eat a hot pepper, your mucus membranes in your mouth and throat start producing extra mucus to protect you. Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems. We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong. It does its job quietly, making everything run smoothly, keeping our inner tissues soft and flexible enough to fight off invaders. answer : Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems. 2. Just the name itself will make you giggle. It's a great word that conjures visions of slime and unpleasantness. It is perhaps the most annoying part of having a cold or allergies. Mucus, however, plays a very important role in defense of our bodies and our health. In fact, it's high time mucus got a lot more respect. First, there are some amazing facts about mucus that are worthy of respect. Humans produce about a liter of mucus every day, whether they are sick or not. Bony fish and some invertebrates (snails or slugs) also have mucus cells on the outside of their body. This external mucus creates a protective coating that prevents predators' toxins from doing harm. Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems. We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong. We usually only see it when we are sick, and so we tend to dislike it. According to Michael M. Johns, III, MD, however, "mucus is incredibly important for our bodies." Johns, an assistant professor at Emory University, calls mucus "the oil in the engine" of our bodies. Without mucus, our engines, or bodies, would freeze up and stop working properly. Furthermore, mucus is not just the nasty gunk you see when you are sick. It lines the tissues in your mouth, your nose, throat, and lungs. It also is crucial in protecting your digestive system. Mucus puts a protective coating over the surfaces of these tissues, keeping them moist. Most of the time we don't notice mucus is making our lives better. It does its job quietly, making everything run smoothly, keeping our inner tissues soft and flexible enough to fight off invaders. Occasionally, though our mucus-making membranes go into overdrive. If you eat a hot pepper, your mucus membranes in your mouth and throat start producing extra mucus to protect you. If you come into contact with pollen, you may get a runny nose and start sneezing and coughing. When these things happen, your mucus systems start making more fluids to wash away the irritating particles. Mucus also has some antibodies that increase our ability to fight off bacteria and viruses. It's hard to appreciate what is essentially slime, but we have mucus for some very good reasons. It helps to keep us healthy and lets us know when our bodies are under attack. We would be wise to respect what our bodies do to keep us safe. So the next time you find yourself reaching for a tissue, remember mucus is your friend and ally. What's in a Name? Mucus is a great word, not only because it gives name to an important bodily function, but also because it is one of those words that simultaneously makes you feel grossed-out and giggly. Other words for this powerfully important human-health tool include slime and phlegm. Slang words for mucus include boogers and snot. All of these words have the same giggle-power, simply from the combination of consonants and vowels. By the way, mucus is an old word; it's been around since the mid-1600s and has roots back to Latin (mucere, to be moldy or musty) and Greek (myxa, mucus). While you may assume that words like snot and boogers are relatively new slang terms, they are not. Snot dates to 1560 and comes from an Old English word, gesnot, and has the same root as the word snout. The word booger is not quite as old but has been in use since the 1890s. Which correctly summarizes the main point of the second paragraph of "Making the Most of Mucus"? External mucus differs from internal mucus. Many creatures produce mucus. Mucus cells are found in many places. Slimy animals make slimy mucus. answer: Mucus cells are found in many places. 3. Read this short text: Justin's work in student government this year has been quite impressive. He has quietly protested when decisions were unjust. He has written persuasive articles in the school newspaper. He has made impassioned speeches to the student body. He favored thoughtful discussion over raging anger. When the newspaper described him as the Martin Luther King Jr. of our generation, it was not wrong. Which of the following best explains the kind of leader Justin is, based on the reference to Martin Luther King Jr.? Dedicated to government solutions Interested in angry confrontations with officials Interested in using writing to change opinions Supporting and practicing peaceful change answer: Dedicated to government solutions 4. Read the following excerpt from a news article: Damion has shown the patience of Job in waiting for the zoning board to decide about his home addition. The mention of Job is which of the following references? Biblical Historical Mythological Pop culture answer: Mythological 5. Just the name itself will make you giggle. It's a great word that conjures visions of slime and unpleasantness. It is perhaps the most annoying part of having a cold or allergies. Mucus, however, plays a very important role in defense of our bodies and our health. In fact, it's high time mucus got a lot more respect. First, there are some amazing facts about mucus that are worthy of respect. Humans produce about a liter of mucus every day, whether they are sick or not. Bony fish and some invertebrates (snails or slugs) also have mucus cells on the outside of their body. This external mucus creates a protective coating that prevents predators' toxins from doing harm. Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems. We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong. We usually only see it when we are sick, and so we tend to dislike it. According to Michael M. Johns, III, MD, however, "mucus is incredibly important for our bodies." Johns, an assistant professor at Emory University, calls mucus "the oil in the engine" of our bodies. Without mucus, our engines, or bodies, would freeze up and stop working properly. Furthermore, mucus is not just the nasty gunk you see when you are sick. It lines the tissues in your mouth, your nose, throat, and lungs. It also is crucial in protecting your digestive system. Mucus puts a protective coating over the surfaces of these tissues, keeping them moist. Most of the time we don't notice mucus is making our lives better. It does its job quietly, making everything run smoothly, keeping our inner tissues soft and flexible enough to fight off invaders. Occasionally, though our mucus-making membranes go into overdrive. If you eat a hot pepper, your mucus membranes in your mouth and throat start producing extra mucus to protect you. If you come into contact with pollen, you may get a runny nose and start sneezing and coughing. When these things happen, your mucus systems start making more fluids to wash away the irritating particles. Mucus also has some antibodies that increase our ability to fight off bacteria and viruses. It's hard to appreciate what is essentially slime, but we have mucus for some very good reasons. It helps to keep us healthy and lets us know when our bodies are under attack. We would be wise to respect what our bodies do to keep us safe. So the next time you find yourself reaching for a tissue, remember mucus is your friend and ally. What's in a Name? Mucus is a great word, not only because it gives name to an important bodily function, but also because it is one of those words that simultaneously makes you feel grossed-out and giggly. Other words for this powerfully important human-health tool include slime and phlegm. Slang words for mucus include boogers and snot. All of these words have the same giggle-power, simply from the combination of consonants and vowels. By the way, mucus is an old word; it's been around since the mid-1600s and has roots back to Latin (mucere, to be moldy or musty) and Greek (myxa, mucus). While you may assume that words like snot and boogers are relatively new slang terms, they are not. Snot dates to 1560 and comes from an Old English word, gesnot, and has the same root as the word snout. The word booger is not quite as old but has been in use since the 1890s. Which line from "What's in a Name" best illustrates its main point? Mucus is a great word By the way, mucus is an old word Words like snot and boogers are relatively new The word booger is not quite as old answer: Mucus is a great word 6. Making the Most of Mucus Just the name itself will make you giggle. It's a great word that conjures visions of slime and unpleasantness. It is perhaps the most annoying part of having a cold or allergies. Mucus, however, plays a very important role in defense of our bodies and our health. In fact, it's high time mucus got a lot more respect. First, there are some amazing facts about mucus that are worthy of respect. Humans produce about a liter of mucus every day, whether they are sick or not. Bony fish and some invertebrates (snails or slugs) also have mucus cells on the outside of their body. This external mucus creates a protective coating that prevents predators' toxins from doing harm. Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems. We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong. We usually only see it when we are sick, and so we tend to dislike it. According to Michael M. Johns, III, MD, however, "mucus is incredibly important for our bodies." Johns, an assistant professor at Emory University, calls mucus "the oil in the engine" of our bodies. Without mucus, our engines, or bodies, would freeze up and stop working properly. Furthermore, mucus is not just the nasty gunk you see when you are sick. It lines the tissues in your mouth, your nose, throat, and lungs. It also is crucial in protecting your digestive system. Mucus puts a protective coating over the surfaces of these tissues, keeping them moist. Most of the time we don't notice mucus is making our lives better. It does its job quietly, making everything run smoothly, keeping our inner tissues soft and flexible enough to fight off invaders. Occasionally, though our mucus-making membranes go into overdrive. If you eat a hot pepper, your mucus membranes in your mouth and throat start producing extra mucus to protect you. If you come into contact with pollen, you may get a runny nose and start sneezing and coughing. When these things happen, your mucus systems start making more fluids to wash away the irritating particles. Mucus also has some antibodies that increase our ability to fight off bacteria and viruses. It's hard to appreciate what is essentially slime, but we have mucus for some very good reasons. It helps to keep us healthy and lets us know when our bodies are under attack. We would be wise to respect what our bodies do to keep us safe. So the next time you find yourself reaching for a tissue, remember mucus is your friend and ally. What's in a Name? Mucus is a great word, not only because it gives name to an important bodily function, but also because it is one of those words that simultaneously makes you feel grossed-out and giggly. Other words for this powerfully important human-health tool include slime and phlegm. Slang words for mucus include boogers and snot. All of these words have the same giggle-power, simply from the combination of consonants and vowels. By the way, mucus is an old word; it's been around since the mid-1600s and has roots back to Latin (mucere, to be moldy or musty) and Greek (myxa, mucus). While you may assume that words like snot and boogers are relatively new slang terms, they are not. Snot dates to 1560 and comes from an Old English word, gesnot, and has the same root as the word snout. The word booger is not quite as old but has been in use since the 1890s. Which states how "Making the Most of Mucus" uses the quotation? To create a metaphor for the importance of mucus To list specific functions of mucus in the body To support the idea that mucus is needed by our bodies To suggest mucus has a well-deserved bad reputation answer: To suggest mucus has a well-deserved bad reputation 7. Making the Most of Mucus Just the name itself will make you giggle. It's a great word that conjures visions of slime and unpleasantness. It is perhaps the most annoying part of having a cold or allergies. Mucus, however, plays a very important role in defense of our bodies and our health. In fact, it's high time mucus got a lot more respect. First, there are some amazing facts about mucus that are worthy of respect. Humans produce about a liter of mucus every day, whether they are sick or not. Bony fish and some invertebrates (snails or slugs) also have mucus cells on the outside of their body. This external mucus creates a protective coating that prevents predators' toxins from doing harm. Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems. We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong. We usually only see it when we are sick, and so we tend to dislike it. According to Michael M. Johns, III, MD, however, "mucus is incredibly important for our bodies." Johns, an assistant professor at Emory University, calls mucus "the oil in the engine" of our bodies. Without mucus, our engines, or bodies, would freeze up and stop working properly. Furthermore, mucus is not just the nasty gunk you see when you are sick. It lines the tissues in your mouth, your nose, throat, and lungs. It also is crucial in protecting your digestive system. Mucus puts a protective coating over the surfaces of these tissues, keeping them moist. Most of the time we don't notice mucus is making our lives better. It does its job quietly, making everything run smoothly, keeping our inner tissues soft and flexible enough to fight off invaders. Occasionally, though our mucus-making membranes go into overdrive. If you eat a hot pepper, your mucus membranes in your mouth and throat start producing extra mucus to protect you. If you come into contact with pollen, you may get a runny nose and start sneezing and coughing. When these things happen, your mucus systems start making more fluids to wash away the irritating particles. Mucus also has some antibodies that increase our ability to fight off bacteria and viruses. It's hard to appreciate what is essentially slime, but we have mucus for some very good reasons. It helps to keep us healthy and lets us know when our bodies are under attack. We would be wise to respect what our bodies do to keep us safe. So the next time you find yourself reaching for a tissue, remember mucus is your friend and ally. What's in a Name? Mucus is a great word, not only because it gives name to an important bodily function, but also because it is one of those words that simultaneously makes you feel grossed-out and giggly. Other words for this powerfully important human-health tool include slime and phlegm. Slang words for mucus include boogers and snot. All of these words have the same giggle-power, simply from the combination of consonants and vowels. By the way, mucus is an old word; it's been around since the mid-1600s and has roots back to Latin (mucere, to be moldy or musty) and Greek (myxa, mucus). While you may assume that words like snot and boogers are relatively new slang terms, they are not. Snot dates to 1560 and comes from an Old English word, gesnot, and has the same root as the word snout. The word booger is not quite as old but has been in use since the 1890s. Read this sentence from the main text: It's hard to appreciate what is essentially slime, but we have mucus for some very good reasons. What purpose does the word slime serve in this sentence? It introduces the idea that the presence of mucus has health benefits for most humans. It introduces the idea that bodies are under attack whenever there is mucus. It refers to most humans' opinion of mucus and contrasts with the more scientific term. It suggests mucus deserves the lack of respect it receives. answer: It introduces the idea that bodies are under attack whenever there is mucus. 8. Making the Most of Mucus Just the name itself will make you giggle. It's a great word that conjures visions of slime and unpleasantness. It is perhaps the most annoying part of having a cold or allergies. Mucus, however, plays a very important role in defense of our bodies and our health. In fact, it's high time mucus got a lot more respect. First, there are some amazing facts about mucus that are worthy of respect. Humans produce about a liter of mucus every day, whether they are sick or not. Bony fish and some invertebrates (snails or slugs) also have mucus cells on the outside of their body. This external mucus creates a protective coating that prevents predators' toxins from doing harm. Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems. We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong. We usually only see it when we are sick, and so we tend to dislike it. According to Michael M. Johns, III, MD, however, "mucus is incredibly important for our bodies." Johns, an assistant professor at Emory University, calls mucus "the oil in the engine" of our bodies. Without mucus, our engines, or bodies, would freeze up and stop working properly. Furthermore, mucus is not just the nasty gunk you see when you are sick. It lines the tissues in your mouth, your nose, throat, and lungs. It also is crucial in protecting your digestive system. Mucus puts a protective coating over the surfaces of these tissues, keeping them moist. Most of the time we don't notice mucus is making our lives better. It does its job quietly, making everything run smoothly, keeping our inner tissues soft and flexible enough to fight off invaders. Occasionally, though our mucus-making membranes go into overdrive. If you eat a hot pepper, your mucus membranes in your mouth and throat start producing extra mucus to protect you. If you come into contact with pollen, you may get a runny nose and start sneezing and coughing. When these things happen, your mucus systems start making more fluids to wash away the irritating particles. Mucus also has some antibodies that increase our ability to fight off bacteria and viruses. It's hard to appreciate what is essentially slime, but we have mucus for some very good reasons. It helps to keep us healthy and lets us know when our bodies are under attack. We would be wise to respect what our bodies do to keep us safe. So the next time you find yourself reaching for a tissue, remember mucus is your friend and ally. What's in a Name? Mucus is a great word, not only because it gives name to an important bodily function, but also because it is one of those words that simultaneously makes you feel grossed-out and giggly. Other words for this powerfully important human-health tool include slime and phlegm. Slang words for mucus include boogers and snot. All of these words have the same giggle-power, simply from the combination of consonants and vowels. By the way, mucus is an old word; it's been around since the mid-1600s and has roots back to Latin (mucere, to be moldy or musty) and Greek (myxa, mucus). While you may assume that words like snot and boogers are relatively new slang terms, they are not. Snot dates to 1560 and comes from an Old English word, gesnot, and has the same root as the word snout. The word booger is not quite as old but has been in use since the 1890s. Read this sentence from the main text: First, there are some amazing facts about mucus that are worthy of respect. What purpose does this sentence serve in the second paragraph? It begins a list of how mucus keeps us healthy. It introduces the main idea of the paragraph. It offers a counterargument to the main point about mucus. It summarizes the key points about invertebrate slime. answer: It summarizes the key points about invertebrate slime. 9. Even if you don't speak Spanish, you know a biblioteca most likely has something to do with which of the following? Books Writing Building Memory answer: building 10. books 11. An advertisement for a security system features a family sleeping in their beautiful home. It is dark and the audience hears someone trying to open the door. No one in the family wakes up as the thief open a window and climbs through. In the next scene, a famous actor tells the audience they should buy the security system. Which of the following correctly names the propaganda technique used in this ad? Facts and stats and card stacking Glittering generalities and transfer Plain folks and bandwagon Testimonial and fear answer: Testimonial and fear 12. Read the following slogan from a soft drink commercial: Sprinko: Join the new taste of your generation! This slogan is using which of the following propaganda techniques? Bandwagon Card stacking Glittering generality Transfer answer: Card stacking 13. Making the Most of Mucus Just the name itself will make you giggle. It's a great word that conjures visions of slime and unpleasantness. It is perhaps the most annoying part of having a cold or allergies. Mucus, however, plays a very important role in defense of our bodies and our health. In fact, it's high time mucus got a lot more respect. First, there are some amazing facts about mucus that are worthy of respect. Humans produce about a liter of mucus every day, whether they are sick or not. Bony fish and some invertebrates (snails or slugs) also have mucus cells on the outside of their body. This external mucus creates a protective coating that prevents predators' toxins from doing harm. Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems. We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong. We usually only see it when we are sick, and so we tend to dislike it. According to Michael M. Johns, III, MD, however, "mucus is incredibly important for our bodies." Johns, an assistant professor at Emory University, calls mucus "the oil in the engine" of our bodies. Without mucus, our engines, or bodies, would freeze up and stop working properly. Furthermore, mucus is not just the nasty gunk you see when you are sick. It lines the tissues in your mouth, your nose, throat, and lungs. It also is crucial in protecting your digestive system. Mucus puts a protective coating over the surfaces of these tissues, keeping them moist. Most of the time we don't notice mucus is making our lives better. It does its job quietly, making everything run smoothly, keeping our inner tissues soft and flexible enough to fight off invaders. Occasionally, though our mucus-making membranes go into overdrive. If you eat a hot pepper, your mucus membranes in your mouth and throat start producing extra mucus to protect you. If you come into contact with pollen, you may get a runny nose and start sneezing and coughing. When these things happen, your mucus systems start making more fluids to wash away the irritating particles. Mucus also has some antibodies that increase our ability to fight off bacteria and viruses. It's hard to appreciate what is essentially slime, but we have mucus for some very good reasons. It helps to keep us healthy and lets us know when our bodies are under attack. We would be wise to respect what our bodies do to keep us safe. So the next time you find yourself reaching for a tissue, remember mucus is your friend and ally. What's in a Name? Mucus is a great word, not only because it gives name to an important bodily function, but also because it is one of those words that simultaneously makes you feel grossed-out and giggly. Other words for this powerfully important human-health tool include slime and phlegm. Slang words for mucus include boogers and snot. All of these words have the same giggle-power, simply from the combination of consonants and vowels. By the way, mucus is an old word; it's been around since the mid-1600s and has roots back to Latin (mucere, to be moldy or musty) and Greek (myxa, mucus). While you may assume that words like snot and boogers are relatively new slang terms, they are not. Snot dates to 1560 and comes from an Old English word, gesnot, and has the same root as the word snout. The word booger is not quite as old but has been in use since the 1890s. Read this sentence from the text: It's a great word that conjures visions of slime and unpleasantness. What is another word for conjures as used in this context? Creates Invests Marks Softens answer: Invests 14. Making the Most of Mucus Just the name itself will make you giggle. It's a great word that conjures visions of slime and unpleasantness. It is perhaps the most annoying part of having a cold or allergies. Mucus, however, plays a very important role in defense of our bodies and our health. In fact, it's high time mucus got a lot more respect. First, there are some amazing facts about mucus that are worthy of respect. Humans produce about a liter of mucus every day, whether they are sick or not. Bony fish and some invertebrates (snails or slugs) also have mucus cells on the outside of their body. This external mucus creates a protective coating that prevents predators' toxins from doing harm. Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems. We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong. We usually only see it when we are sick, and so we tend to dislike it. According to Michael M. Johns, III, MD, however, "mucus is incredibly important for our bodies." Johns, an assistant professor at Emory University, calls mucus "the oil in the engine" of our bodies. Without mucus, our engines, or bodies, would freeze up and stop working properly. Furthermore, mucus is not just the nasty gunk you see when you are sick. It lines the tissues in your mouth, your nose, throat, and lungs. It also is crucial in protecting your digestive system. Mucus puts a protective coating over the surfaces of these tissues, keeping them moist. Most of the time we don't notice mucus is making our lives better. It does its job quietly, making everything run smoothly, keeping our inner tissues soft and flexible enough to fight off invaders. Occasionally, though our mucus-making membranes go into overdrive. If you eat a hot pepper, your mucus membranes in your mouth and throat start producing extra mucus to protect you. If you come into contact with pollen, you may get a runny nose and start sneezing and coughing. When these things happen, your mucus systems start making more fluids to wash away the irritating particles. Mucus also has some antibodies that increase our ability to fight off bacteria and viruses. It's hard to appreciate what is essentially slime, but we have mucus for some very good reasons. It helps to keep us healthy and lets us know when our bodies are under attack. We would be wise to respect what our bodies do to keep us safe. So the next time you find yourself reaching for a tissue, remember mucus is your friend and ally. What's in a Name? Mucus is a great word, not only because it gives name to an important bodily function, but also because it is one of those words that simultaneously makes you feel grossed-out and giggly. Other words for this powerfully important human-health tool include slime and phlegm. Slang words for mucus include boogers and snot. All of these words have the same giggle-power, simply from the combination of consonants and vowels. By the way, mucus is an old word; it's been around since the mid-1600s and has roots back to Latin (mucere, to be moldy or musty) and Greek (myxa, mucus). While you may assume that words like snot and boogers are relatively new slang terms, they are not. Snot dates to 1560 and comes from an Old English word, gesnot, and has the same root as the word snout. The word booger is not quite as old but has been in use since the 1890s. Read this line from the main text: Furthermore, mucus is not just the nasty gunk you see when you are sick. Which line from the "What's in a Name?" article makes a similar claim? Mucus is a great word, not only because it gives name to an important bodily function Other words for this powerfully important human-health tool include slime and phlegm. All of these words have the same giggle-power, simply from the combination of consonants and vowels. While you may assume that words like snot and boogers are relatively new slang terms, they are not. answer: Making the Most of Mucus Just the name itself will make you giggle. It's a great word that conjures visions of slime and unpleasantness. It is perhaps the most annoying part of having a cold or allergies. Mucus, however, plays a very important role in defense of our bodies and our health. In fact, it's high time mucus got a lot more respect. First, there are some amazing facts about mucus that are worthy of respect. Humans produce about a liter of mucus every day, whether they are sick or not. Bony fish and some invertebrates (snails or slugs) also have mucus cells on the outside of their body. This external mucus creates a protective coating that prevents predators' toxins from doing harm. Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems. We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong. We usually only see it when we are sick, and so we tend to dislike it. According to Michael M. Johns, III, MD, however, "mucus is incredibly important for our bodies." Johns, an assistant professor at Emory University, calls mucus "the oil in the engine" of our bodies. Without mucus, our engines, or bodies, would freeze up and stop working properly. Furthermore, mucus is not just the nasty gunk you see when you are sick. It lines the tissues in your mouth, your nose, throat, and lungs. It also is crucial in protecting your digestive system. Mucus puts a protective coating over the surfaces of these tissues, keeping them moist. Most of the time we don't notice mucus is making our lives better. It does its job quietly, making everything run smoothly, keeping our inner tissues soft and flexible enough to fight off invaders. Occasionally, though our mucus-making membranes go into overdrive. If you eat a hot pepper, your mucus membranes in your mouth and throat start producing extra mucus to protect you. If you come into contact with pollen, you may get a runny nose and start sneezing and coughing. When these things happen, your mucus systems start making more fluids to wash away the irritating particles. Mucus also has some antibodies that increase our ability to fight off bacteria and viruses. It's hard to appreciate what is essentially slime, but we have mucus for some very good reasons. It helps to keep us healthy and lets us know when our bodies are under attack. We would be wise to respect what our bodies do to keep us safe. So the next time you find yourself reaching for a tissue, remember mucus is your friend and ally. What's in a Name? Mucus is a great word, not only because it gives name to an important bodily function, but also because it is one of those words that simultaneously makes you feel grossed-out and giggly. Other words for this powerfully important human-health tool include slime and phlegm. Slang words for mucus include boogers and snot. All of these words have the same giggle-power, simply from the combination of consonants and vowels. By the way, mucus is an old word; it's been around since the mid-1600s and has roots back to Latin (mucere, to be moldy or musty) and Greek (myxa, mucus). While you may assume that words like snot and boogers are relatively new slang terms, they are not. Snot dates to 1560 and comes from an Old English word, gesnot, and has the same root as the word snout. The word booger is not quite as old but has been in use since the 1890s. Read this line from the main text: Furthermore, mucus is not just the nasty gunk you see when you are sick. Which line from the "What's in a Name?" article makes a similar claim? Mucus is a great word, not only because it gives name to an important bodily function Other words for this powerfully important human-health tool include slime and phlegm. All of these words have the same giggle-power, simply from the combination of consonants and vowels. While you may assume that words like snot and boogers are relatively new slang terms, they are not. 15. Making the Most of Mucus Just the name itself will make you giggle. It's a great word that conjures visions of slime and unpleasantness. It is perhaps the most annoying part of having a cold or allergies. Mucus, however, plays a very important role in defense of our bodies and our health. In fact, it's high time mucus got a lot more respect. First, there are some amazing facts about mucus that are worthy of respect. Humans produce about a liter of mucus every day, whether they are sick or not. Bony fish and some invertebrates (snails or slugs) also have mucus cells on the outside of their body. This external mucus creates a protective coating that prevents predators' toxins from doing harm. Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems. We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong. We usually only see it when we are sick, and so we tend to dislike it. According to Michael M. Johns, III, MD, however, "mucus is incredibly important for our bodies." Johns, an assistant professor at Emory University, calls mucus "the oil in the engine" of our bodies. Without mucus, our engines, or bodies, would freeze up and stop working properly. Furthermore, mucus is not just the nasty gunk you see when you are sick. It lines the tissues in your mouth, your nose, throat, and lungs. It also is crucial in protecting your digestive system. Mucus puts a protective coating over the surfaces of these tissues, keeping them moist. Most of the time we don't notice mucus is making our lives better. It does its job quietly, making everything run smoothly, keeping our inner tissues soft and flexible enough to fight off invaders. Occasionally, though our mucus-making membranes go into overdrive. If you eat a hot pepper, your mucus membranes in your mouth and throat start producing extra mucus to protect you. If you come into contact with pollen, you may get a runny nose and start sneezing and coughing. When these things happen, your mucus systems start making more fluids to wash away the irritating particles. Mucus also has some antibodies that increase our ability to fight off bacteria and viruses. It's hard to appreciate what is essentially slime, but we have mucus for some very good reasons. It helps to keep us healthy and lets us know when our bodies are under attack. We would be wise to respect what our bodies do to keep us safe. So the next time you find yourself reaching for a tissue, remember mucus is your friend and ally. What's in a Name? Mucus is a great word, not only because it gives name to an important bodily function, but also because it is one of those words that simultaneously makes you feel grossed-out and giggly. Other words for this powerfully important human-health tool include slime and phlegm. Slang words for mucus include boogers and snot. All of these words have the same giggle-power, simply from the combination of consonants and vowels. By the way, mucus is an old word; it's been around since the mid-1600s and has roots back to Latin (mucere, to be moldy or musty) and Greek (myxa, mucus). While you may assume that words like snot and boogers are relatively new slang terms, they are not. Snot dates to 1560 and comes from an Old English word, gesnot, and has the same root as the word snout. The word booger is not quite as old but has been in use since the 1890s. Which word describes both texts? Doubtful Informative Passionate Sympathetic answer: sympathetic 16. Read this sentence: The currant leadership does value the type of discussion we have grown accustomed to. Which of the words in this sentence is misspelled? Currant Leadership Discussion Accustomed answer: discussion
just send the question not the article
I go question by question?
i meant like send the question and your answer but not the article
Ok
Which line from the text explains people’s attitude about mucus? If you eat a hot pepper, your mucus membranes in your mouth and throat start producing extra mucus to protect you. Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems. We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong. It does its job quietly, making everything run smoothly, keeping our inner tissues soft and flexible enough to fight off invaders. answer : Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems.
Are you thereeee??? @beckyg111
sorry i was at my question
Oh okay
Which line from the text explains people’s attitude about mucus? If you eat a hot pepper, your mucus membranes in your mouth and throat start producing extra mucus to protect you. Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems. We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong. It does its job quietly, making everything run smoothly, keeping our inner tissues soft and flexible enough to fight off invaders. answer : Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems.
am i correct? @beckyg111
checking
Ok
i cant find the question in my test
We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong
Let me give you the full question
Making the Most of Mucus Just the name itself will make you giggle. It's a great word that conjures visions of slime and unpleasantness. It is perhaps the most annoying part of having a cold or allergies. Mucus, however, plays a very important role in defense of our bodies and our health. In fact, it's high time mucus got a lot more respect. First, there are some amazing facts about mucus that are worthy of respect. Humans produce about a liter of mucus every day, whether they are sick or not. Bony fish and some invertebrates (snails or slugs) also have mucus cells on the outside of their body. This external mucus creates a protective coating that prevents predators' toxins from doing harm. Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems. We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong. We usually only see it when we are sick, and so we tend to dislike it. According to Michael M. Johns, III, MD, however, "mucus is incredibly important for our bodies." Johns, an assistant professor at Emory University, calls mucus "the oil in the engine" of our bodies. Without mucus, our engines, or bodies, would freeze up and stop working properly. Furthermore, mucus is not just the nasty gunk you see when you are sick. It lines the tissues in your mouth, your nose, throat, and lungs. It also is crucial in protecting your digestive system. Mucus puts a protective coating over the surfaces of these tissues, keeping them moist. Most of the time we don't notice mucus is making our lives better. It does its job quietly, making everything run smoothly, keeping our inner tissues soft and flexible enough to fight off invaders. Occasionally, though our mucus-making membranes go into overdrive. If you eat a hot pepper, your mucus membranes in your mouth and throat start producing extra mucus to protect you. If you come into contact with pollen, you may get a runny nose and start sneezing and coughing. When these things happen, your mucus systems start making more fluids to wash away the irritating particles. Mucus also has some antibodies that increase our ability to fight off bacteria and viruses. It's hard to appreciate what is essentially slime, but we have mucus for some very good reasons. It helps to keep us healthy and lets us know when our bodies are under attack. We would be wise to respect what our bodies do to keep us safe. So the next time you find yourself reaching for a tissue, remember mucus is your friend and ally. Which line from the text explains people’s attitude about mucus? If you eat a hot pepper, your mucus membranes in your mouth and throat start producing extra mucus to protect you. Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems. We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong. It does its job quietly, making everything run smoothly, keeping our inner tissues soft and flexible enough to fight off invaders. answer : Humans produce mucus to protect our stomachs, our lungs, and several other systems.
no that is wrong
try again hint: why do you not like mucus?
We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong.
yes
Did u get this one correct?
who is your teacher? do you have math too?
i remember getting it right
i took it yesterday
Yes I have math. My teacher is Gregory McManus
i have Ms. gladdin for LA
and Ms. Marcella Smith Walker for math
Can you make sure I got the question right for sure. Can you go back to your test and see please? :)
what lesson
4
It's 4.00 pretest
i cant find a question like that...just this one: Read this sentence from the main text: We tend to not like mucus because it is a considered a symptom or sign that something is wrong. What purpose does this sentence serve in the text as a whole? It explains the main point of the discussion of why mucus is important. It introduces another reason to like mucus. It introduces the quotation from Dr. Johns. It provides an explanation of our reaction to mucus. Points earned on this question: 1
Oh okay yea it's right. The question is just backwards :)
ok
geny i really have to go
like REALLY have to go
Nooooo! :(((
ok so hers my secret
I really need your help!
i copy the question and paste it online
I do that too! Lol
sometimes it takes you to open study and shows you the same question you need help on
cool just do that, i really have to go
I know!! :)
But noooo! Don't leave. What do u have to go do :(
Ask someone for help they will help you more if they know you just want someone to check your work cool gtg bye
It would be awesome, if you just gave me your username and password and I wouldn't have to ask you for the answers. Lol
because i havent worked on math in the longest time. i really have to work on it or else illl get kicked out
geny that would be cool. but i really want you to learn on this subject
plz dont cheat
im not. In actually learning
I'll help you with math so you don't get kicked out of you help me with this :) deal?
I'll help you with math so you don't get kicked out if you help me with this. Deal?? :)
thats great keep learning. you send me a email saying "i thought you were my friend :( im so sad because your not replying to me :(((" by that im guessing you meant helping you cheat. But if i was a true friend i wouldnt help you cheat.
No I didn't mean it like that. I promise! You are my friend. Your an amazing friend. :)
Thank you, just i really have to go. I usually start at 7 am and finish at 10pm
But anyways, we are both not learning because we are just looking up the answer online. So it's like we are already cheating. Lol
i woke up late and i have to start working.
no, no. i do that to check my work. difference
Lol
i know someone else eho can help you
Who
@flvs.net
Lol
I'll give you the answers to math if you give me answers to this
no
im sorry i dont want answers
Ok
bye😘

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