A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

Loser66

  • one year ago

@GIL-ojei

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Loser66
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @GIL.ojei

  2. Loser66
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    example, right?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes

  4. Loser66
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \(x \in R^n\), they define \(\vec x =(x_1, x_2)\) and by definition above \(\vec x \in R^n\) must have n-tuples, that is \(\vec x =(x_1,x_2,......,x_n)\) so that if it stops at \(x_2\), then the tuples after it will repeat \(x_2\) in n-1 times. Why n-1? because you have \(x_1 \) there.

  5. carolinar7
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Hello

  6. Loser66
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Like in \(\mathbb R^3\), \(vec x =(x_1,x_2,x_3)\) , in topology, if they say \(\vec x=(x_1,x_2)\) \(\in \mathbb R^3\), that is \(vec x=(x_1,x_2,x_2)\), hence \(x_2\) repeats n-1 =3-1=2 times. Got that part??

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    sir, why did x2 repeat twice?

  8. Loser66
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    They define it that way!! like your parents "define" you are GIL.

  9. Loser66
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so that everybody will call you GIL. That is it.

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    is it from the definition x(x1,x2) den because it is not up R^3

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    which ought to be (x1,x2,x3)?

  12. Loser66
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Actually, this book is not good. If it is written in other language, I have no comments. But it is written in English, but they changed tuple to topple; scalar to sealar. At the first read, I didn't understand what it means. ha!!

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    sir please have pity on my and help me out or if you have any self teachable book, you can help with , please do. it means i have to understand this before understanding matric and topological space

  14. Loser66
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Anyway, it is just the way they define the operator. it is not important because it doesn't apply to any other problem.

  15. Loser66
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Again, it is not matric!! it is metric.

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok sir

  17. Loser66
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    One more thing!! I didn't take topology yet!!. My friends warned me not to take that course. It is so confused and apply to nowhere.

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    hahahahahahaah. but it is a call course for me . i have to learn it . ok can you take me metric space?

  19. Loser66
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    To the topic I never know before, I can make a SHORT research to know what it is. Don't forget, SHORT, not long.

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok but can you open to page 14 of the book, under remark ,,,, i dont get a thing there

  21. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.