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anonymous

  • one year ago

Estimate the angle of rotation of the stars in the time-lapse photo. http://cds.flipswitch.com/tools/asset/media/111660

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Help please :/

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @dan815

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Im not sure if its 90 or 180

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    If you were to create an angle i'm confused

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    From what angle are we looking at it from?

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Time lapse photography is made by placing a camera on a tripod and keeping the camera’s shutter open for a long time. If the camera is pointed in the direction of the stars, the stars appear to rotate around Polaris, also known as the North Star or the Pole Star.

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thats all it gave me

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    would it be 90

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I think you are correct, but I'm not a 100% sure.

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay thank you very much

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438312164441:dw| so this is what it may look like right, as it's pointed towards the stars, and is rotating around polaris, so that must be 90 degrees.

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Maybe not exactly, should be close to that...what do you think

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yeah thats what I though and the options were 30, 45, 90, and 180 so i thought it was 90 or 180

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok cool, I think that makes sense :) we are upon agreement, but in any case could you post the right answer when you're done this problem, I'm still skeptical.

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I would, but it's a project and doesn't tell me if it's right or wrong Im sorry.

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    there was another question

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Use your answer from the previous question to estimate the length of time that the camera’s shutter was open. The shutter was open for ____ hours. (Round your answer to the nearest hour and enter only the number.)

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    If the shutter is open for 24 hours, the stars appear to make one complete rotation around Polaris.

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    No worries, so 360 is 24 hours, so all we have to do is \[\frac{ 90 }{ 360 } = ...\]

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You just have to convert it in hours, that shouldn't be too bad

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ohhh wow thats pretty easy just overthinking it thank you. Convert it from min to hours correct?

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Im sorry thank you I appreciate the help

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{ 90 }{ 360 } = 0.25\] that means it's 25% of 24 hours, so now just multiply by 24 to get the answer in hours, 0.25(24).

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    No problem!

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    to get 6

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Perfect

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thank you :)

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Your welcome :)

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