anonymous
  • anonymous
Estimate the angle of rotation of the stars in the time-lapse photo. http://cds.flipswitch.com/tools/asset/media/111660
Geometry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
Help please :/
anonymous
  • anonymous
@dan815
anonymous
  • anonymous
Im not sure if its 90 or 180

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anonymous
  • anonymous
If you were to create an angle i'm confused
anonymous
  • anonymous
From what angle are we looking at it from?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Time lapse photography is made by placing a camera on a tripod and keeping the camera’s shutter open for a long time. If the camera is pointed in the direction of the stars, the stars appear to rotate around Polaris, also known as the North Star or the Pole Star.
anonymous
  • anonymous
thats all it gave me
anonymous
  • anonymous
would it be 90
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think you are correct, but I'm not a 100% sure.
anonymous
  • anonymous
okay thank you very much
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1438312164441:dw| so this is what it may look like right, as it's pointed towards the stars, and is rotating around polaris, so that must be 90 degrees.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Maybe not exactly, should be close to that...what do you think
anonymous
  • anonymous
yeah thats what I though and the options were 30, 45, 90, and 180 so i thought it was 90 or 180
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ok cool, I think that makes sense :) we are upon agreement, but in any case could you post the right answer when you're done this problem, I'm still skeptical.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I would, but it's a project and doesn't tell me if it's right or wrong Im sorry.
anonymous
  • anonymous
there was another question
anonymous
  • anonymous
Use your answer from the previous question to estimate the length of time that the camera’s shutter was open. The shutter was open for ____ hours. (Round your answer to the nearest hour and enter only the number.)
anonymous
  • anonymous
If the shutter is open for 24 hours, the stars appear to make one complete rotation around Polaris.
anonymous
  • anonymous
No worries, so 360 is 24 hours, so all we have to do is \[\frac{ 90 }{ 360 } = ...\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
You just have to convert it in hours, that shouldn't be too bad
anonymous
  • anonymous
ohhh wow thats pretty easy just overthinking it thank you. Convert it from min to hours correct?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Im sorry thank you I appreciate the help
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\frac{ 90 }{ 360 } = 0.25\] that means it's 25% of 24 hours, so now just multiply by 24 to get the answer in hours, 0.25(24).
anonymous
  • anonymous
No problem!
anonymous
  • anonymous
to get 6
anonymous
  • anonymous
Perfect
anonymous
  • anonymous
thank you :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Your welcome :)

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