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anonymous

  • one year ago

simplest radical form 1 ---- −3 over x6

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438357564010:dw|

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438357606356:dw|

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438357606756:dw|

  4. OregonDuck
    • one year ago
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    you are right

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438357635372:dw|

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i think you are right. Did u see the picture @OregonDuck

  7. OregonDuck
    • one year ago
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    yes i asked my older brother he said so

  8. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    is it your question \[\huge\rm \frac{ 1}{ x^\frac{ -3 }{ 6 }}\] or \[ \huge \frac{ \frac{ -1 }{ 3 } }{ x^6 }\] which one is right ?

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the last one.

  10. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    -1/3 divided by x^6 right ?

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    um.. its the first one actually

  12. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    alright we already solved this question i guess 5 days ago.. hmm :=) well first of all reduce the fraction

  13. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    -3/6= ?

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    -1/2

  15. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    yes right now apply exponent rule \[\huge\rm x^{-m} = \frac{ 1 }{ x^m }\]

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    soo....... 1/ X-1/2

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

  18. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    well there you can't leave the *negative exponent * so that's why apply that exponent rule move x^-1/2 at the top

  19. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    \[\huge\rm \frac{ 1 }{ x^{-m} } = x^m\] example

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @nerlineg in other words flip the fraction

  21. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    well not the exponent one :3

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    when one of you are done here can you help me?

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    wait the probelm is 1 over M|dw:1438358345252:dw|

  24. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    so that's why i didn't use *flip the fraction* first step reduce the fraction you get \[\huge\rm \frac{ 1 }{ x^\frac{ -1 }{ 2} }\]

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok i understand that

  26. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438358519321:dw| flip 1/x^{-1/2) fraction not just -1/2

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so is it already flipped in your pic^^^^^ or you haven't done it yet

  28. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    do you know why we have to do that ?

  29. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    we need *positive exponent*

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yeah, it's a negative and you cant have a negative.

  31. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    yes right

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @jcoury how was i being mean? lol

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okhay then whats next?

  34. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    alright so now flip the fraction *exponent rule* \[\huge\rm \frac{\color{Red}{ 1} }{\color{red}{ x}^\frac{ -1 }{ 2} }\]

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    you want me to flip that?

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @nerlineg check your messages

  37. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    yes i changed that color so u can understand :3

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438358973582:dw|

  39. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    yayay that's right

  40. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    now you can convert 1/2 exponent to square root

  41. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    over one is the same thing as no fraction though

  42. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    \[a^\frac{ 1 }{ 2 } = \sqrt{a}\]

  43. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438359068326:dw|

  44. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    well no..

  45. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    this is how my teacher tough me to write it.. is this right?

  46. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    x^1/2 = whata ?

  47. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @nerlineg the ^1 needs to be inside the radical

  48. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438359204293:dw|

  49. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438359185853:dw|

  50. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    \[\huge\rm \frac{ x^\frac{ 1 }{ 2 } }{ 1 } = x^\frac{ 1 }{ 2 }\] doesn't matter if you write one or not at the denominator so forget about one now you just have \[\huge\rm x^\frac{ 1 }{ 2 }\]

  51. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    convert \[\huge\rm x^\frac{ 1 }{ 2 }\] to square root of x

  52. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438359295654:dw|

  53. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    right but simple radical signs means square root so you don't need to write 2

  54. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so did i learn it the wrong way?

  55. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    \[\huge\rm x^\frac{ 1 }{ 2 }= \sqrt{2}\]

  56. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    \[\sqrt{ } \] <-square root

  57. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    \(\color{blue}{\text{Originally Posted by}}\) @Nnesha \[\huge\rm x^\frac{ 1 }{ 2 }= \sqrt{2}\] \(\color{blue}{\text{End of Quote}}\) correction: \[\huge\rm x^\frac{ 1 }{ 2 }= \sqrt{x}\]

  58. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ohok can i also have it both ways??

  59. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    both ways ?

  60. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    do you mean this one ?|dw:1438359494260:dw|

  61. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yess

  62. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    no that's *mathematically * wrong simple radical signs means square root

  63. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @nerlineg that's the answer

  64. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yeah you don't need a two next to the radical

  65. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438359650632:dw|

  66. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    you don't even need one one is invisible so \[\sqrt{x}\] is perfect

  67. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okhay i have one last question s the expression x3•x3•x3 equivalent to x3•3•3?

  68. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i thiink the answer is no .b.c you need a base

  69. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    is it \[\huge\rm x^3 \times x^3 \times x^3\] equal to \[x^3 \times 3 \times 3 \] ?

  70. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    yes right now bec when you multiply same bases you should add their exponents \[\huge\rm x^m \times x^n \times x^z = x^{m+n+z}\]

  71. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    nooo

  72. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    wait.

  73. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    i got you

  74. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    is it \[\huge\rm x^3 \times x^3 \times x^3\] equal to \[x^{3 \times 3 \times 3} \] ?

  75. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438360101001:dw|

  76. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    ye so when you multiply same bases you should *add* their exponents

  77. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the three are exponents

  78. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    yes i got it :=)

  79. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so the answer is no their not equal ?

  80. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    yes right

  81. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    great job for helping :) i which their wasn't a limit on these golden medals :/

  82. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    if i need any more help i'll tag you!

  83. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    sure &thanks!

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