anonymous
  • anonymous
simplest radical form 1 ---- −3 over x6
Algebra
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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chestercat
  • chestercat
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1438357564010:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1438357606356:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1438357606756:dw|

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More answers

OregonDuck
  • OregonDuck
you are right
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1438357635372:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
i think you are right. Did u see the picture @OregonDuck
OregonDuck
  • OregonDuck
yes i asked my older brother he said so
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
is it your question \[\huge\rm \frac{ 1}{ x^\frac{ -3 }{ 6 }}\] or \[ \huge \frac{ \frac{ -1 }{ 3 } }{ x^6 }\] which one is right ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
the last one.
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
-1/3 divided by x^6 right ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
um.. its the first one actually
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
alright we already solved this question i guess 5 days ago.. hmm :=) well first of all reduce the fraction
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
-3/6= ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
-1/2
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
yes right now apply exponent rule \[\huge\rm x^{-m} = \frac{ 1 }{ x^m }\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
soo....... 1/ X-1/2
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
well there you can't leave the *negative exponent * so that's why apply that exponent rule move x^-1/2 at the top
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
\[\huge\rm \frac{ 1 }{ x^{-m} } = x^m\] example
anonymous
  • anonymous
@nerlineg in other words flip the fraction
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
well not the exponent one :3
anonymous
  • anonymous
when one of you are done here can you help me?
anonymous
  • anonymous
wait the probelm is 1 over M|dw:1438358345252:dw|
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
so that's why i didn't use *flip the fraction* first step reduce the fraction you get \[\huge\rm \frac{ 1 }{ x^\frac{ -1 }{ 2} }\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok i understand that
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
|dw:1438358519321:dw| flip 1/x^{-1/2) fraction not just -1/2
anonymous
  • anonymous
so is it already flipped in your pic^^^^^ or you haven't done it yet
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
do you know why we have to do that ?
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
we need *positive exponent*
anonymous
  • anonymous
yeah, it's a negative and you cant have a negative.
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
yes right
anonymous
  • anonymous
@jcoury how was i being mean? lol
anonymous
  • anonymous
okhay then whats next?
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
alright so now flip the fraction *exponent rule* \[\huge\rm \frac{\color{Red}{ 1} }{\color{red}{ x}^\frac{ -1 }{ 2} }\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
you want me to flip that?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@nerlineg check your messages
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
yes i changed that color so u can understand :3
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1438358973582:dw|
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
yayay that's right
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
now you can convert 1/2 exponent to square root
anonymous
  • anonymous
over one is the same thing as no fraction though
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
\[a^\frac{ 1 }{ 2 } = \sqrt{a}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1438359068326:dw|
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
well no..
anonymous
  • anonymous
this is how my teacher tough me to write it.. is this right?
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
x^1/2 = whata ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@nerlineg the ^1 needs to be inside the radical
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1438359204293:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1438359185853:dw|
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
\[\huge\rm \frac{ x^\frac{ 1 }{ 2 } }{ 1 } = x^\frac{ 1 }{ 2 }\] doesn't matter if you write one or not at the denominator so forget about one now you just have \[\huge\rm x^\frac{ 1 }{ 2 }\]
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
convert \[\huge\rm x^\frac{ 1 }{ 2 }\] to square root of x
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1438359295654:dw|
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
right but simple radical signs means square root so you don't need to write 2
anonymous
  • anonymous
so did i learn it the wrong way?
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
\[\huge\rm x^\frac{ 1 }{ 2 }= \sqrt{2}\]
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
\[\sqrt{ } \] <-square root
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
\(\color{blue}{\text{Originally Posted by}}\) @Nnesha \[\huge\rm x^\frac{ 1 }{ 2 }= \sqrt{2}\] \(\color{blue}{\text{End of Quote}}\) correction: \[\huge\rm x^\frac{ 1 }{ 2 }= \sqrt{x}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
ohok can i also have it both ways??
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
both ways ?
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
do you mean this one ?|dw:1438359494260:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
yess
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
no that's *mathematically * wrong simple radical signs means square root
anonymous
  • anonymous
@nerlineg that's the answer
anonymous
  • anonymous
yeah you don't need a two next to the radical
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1438359650632:dw|
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
you don't even need one one is invisible so \[\sqrt{x}\] is perfect
anonymous
  • anonymous
okhay i have one last question s the expression x3•x3•x3 equivalent to x3•3•3?
anonymous
  • anonymous
i thiink the answer is no .b.c you need a base
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
is it \[\huge\rm x^3 \times x^3 \times x^3\] equal to \[x^3 \times 3 \times 3 \] ?
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
yes right now bec when you multiply same bases you should add their exponents \[\huge\rm x^m \times x^n \times x^z = x^{m+n+z}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
nooo
anonymous
  • anonymous
wait.
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
i got you
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
is it \[\huge\rm x^3 \times x^3 \times x^3\] equal to \[x^{3 \times 3 \times 3} \] ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1438360101001:dw|
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
ye so when you multiply same bases you should *add* their exponents
anonymous
  • anonymous
the three are exponents
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
yes i got it :=)
anonymous
  • anonymous
so the answer is no their not equal ?
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
yes right
anonymous
  • anonymous
great job for helping :) i which their wasn't a limit on these golden medals :/
anonymous
  • anonymous
if i need any more help i'll tag you!
Nnesha
  • Nnesha
sure &thanks!

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