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anonymous

  • one year ago

check attachment below thanks!

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  3. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Set it up as you would a equation of a line graph

  4. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    y-x>0 and y-1>0 solve for y.

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    0?

  6. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    What do you mean

  7. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Solve for y for both of the equations they gave you then we can graph it out y-x >0 what do you get if you solve for y?

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    y=1 ?

  9. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    No...I mean y-x>0 -> y>x

  10. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Now do the same for y-1>0 what do you get

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    y>1

  12. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yes, so we have our equations \[y>x ~~~ \text{and}~~~y>1\] so that should be pretty easy to graph, what does y>x mean?

  13. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Think of it as such, how would you graph y = x?

  14. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Think about it, you should be able to answer this at this stage, make a table of values if you have to.

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    0,1

  16. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Huh?

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    could i graph y=x like that @Astrophysics ??

  18. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    I don't understand what 0,1 mean? Could you use the draw tool

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok so you see the graphs on the answers? would i put my point in 0,1?

  20. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    I mean, I'm just asking you what y = x graph looks like, what would you get if you made just a table of values, meaning plug random points in x, and get a output of y. You can draw it here |dw:1438424373597:dw|

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so wait I'm just picking 1 random x point and 1 random y point?

  22. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    Should I try explaining?

  23. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    easy way....

  24. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    just equate both the graphs =0 instead of > or<

  25. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    Then search two points (any) which satisfies 1st equation to draw its graph...

  26. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    You will see (0,0) and (2,2) satisfies... so draw a line between these two points

  27. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    Now for the second equation its just y=1

  28. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    Drawing both the graph gives.... ___ as the answer (You guess)

  29. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    @dom4958

  30. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Well, lets stop right there for a second. I think the problem is everyone is just giving him answers as we did for the previous problem, and they are not learning anything which is very troubling. So before we jump ahead you should be able to graph y = x, the way to do this is, we can make a table of values...you can do this with any function/ graph, what ever. |dw:1438424828710:dw| since our function is y = x, that means every value we plug in for x will give us the same value for y right? So these are our points for the x,y axis we graph them using (x,y) where x is the horizontal line and y is the vertical line, so if we plug in the points we should get this graph |dw:1438424926208:dw|

  31. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    they have already covered the fact that the inequality signs can be replaced with = signs. They already got y = x and y = 1. I don't get what the issue is (rant over)

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    my issue is that the shaded part on the answers confuses me about which answer to pick

  33. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438425016070:dw|

  34. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Please read everything I've provided, it will help you tremendously.

  35. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    pick a test point and see if it satisfies both . If it does it gets shaded. well pick a test point on y = x y = 1 test points are unnecessary

  36. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    Its easy combine both the equation...... y=x is in the first option. ITs not in the second option... Common.... you can do it. Do as @Astrophysics has told......

  37. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    Your explanations are fine @Astrophysics and @arindameducationusc

  38. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    Thank you @UsukiDoll

  39. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    We're all here to help you, you should take advantage of this, if you don't understand something, just ask. Getting the right answer isn't that important, but the process is, that's the point of all problems.

  40. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    @Astrophysics Right! Ask any conceptual doubt @dom4958 anytime....

  41. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    another example. for y-x > 0 y-1>0 let x = 0, and y = 1 only one inequality is satisfied. so let x = 3 and y = 4 plug those values in for y-x > 0 and y-1>0 to see if both inequalities are true

  42. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    let x = 2 and y = 4 plug those values in for y-x > 0 and y-1>0 to see if both inequalities are true x=3 and y = 4 were off boundary

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