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Astrophysics

  • one year ago

@empty

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  1. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    I made a post cause I had odd number questions asked and that looked gross

  2. Empty
    • one year ago
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    cool let's check it out

  3. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Now find the force law for a central force field that allows a particle to move in a logarithmic spiral orbit given by \[r = k e^{\alpha \theta}\], where k and alpha are constants

  4. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    I guess I should give you some things that will help you lol, \[\frac{ d^2 }{ d \theta ^2 } \left( \frac{ 1 }{ r } \right)+\frac{ 1 }{ r } = -\frac{ \mu r^2 }{ l^2 }F(r)\] it's pretty easy actually

  5. Empty
    • one year ago
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    lol what is all of this I've never seen this before

  6. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    O

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    This is a university physics I assume?

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Fansy stuff hitting the fan

  9. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    This has to do with central force motion, I just assume you know everything

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    empty like my soul

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I know the centripetal acceleration but never heard of central force

  12. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Err this will take some time to explain

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I say we shoot each other with physics knowledge

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I am although a classical physicist

  15. Empty
    • one year ago
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    I could probably figure this out but I feel like there's some method of doing this or reason for doing this.

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    There is reason for everything

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Especially physics is a process of becoming a god

  18. Empty
    • one year ago
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    Haha cool so what about chemistry?

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Chemistry is more earthy application based study

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    there is nothing theoretical about it whereas physics most are

  21. Empty
    • one year ago
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    Oh what do you know about chemistry?

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    empirical vs theoretical

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Chemistry is all knowable

  24. Empty
    • one year ago
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    What does that mean?

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Everything is empirical in chemistry

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Physics mostly rely on the unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics at explaining the physical phenomena.

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    anyway let's get down to the central force business

  28. Empty
    • one year ago
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    Hahaha "Everything is empirical in chemistry"

  29. Empty
    • one year ago
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    I'll be damned if there aren't 8 things listed here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theoretical_chemistry#Branches_of_theoretical_chemistry

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    central force depends on the distance between spherically symmetric object and the object being pondered

  31. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    It has to do with the motion of a system consisted of two bodies affected by a force that is directed along the line connecting the centres of the two bodies, this is the central force. |dw:1438444424125:dw|

  32. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    This sort of requires you to understand lagrangian

  33. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    actually no

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    According to the theory everything with a mass has central force to it however minuscule they are

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    that equation digs up my nostalgia on universal gravitation

  36. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Actually, since I'm too lazy to derive it as it takes too long xD, just read this, if you want... http://www.astro.uwo.ca/~houde/courses/PDF%20files/physics350/Central_force.pdf

  37. Empty
    • one year ago
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    I can derive the euler-lagrange equation with calculus but that's just math and I get that the action gets minimized L=T-U pretty clearly. I guess the question is how do you find the kinetic and potential energy of this system in the first place?

  38. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yeah, pretty much

  39. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Quit giving each other medals

  40. Empty
    • one year ago
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    lolwhat

  41. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    lol

  42. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    try to draw a path of the log central force

  43. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    I can't see the log playing out, just yet

  44. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    \[\frac{ d }{ d \theta } \left( \frac{ 1 }{ r } \right) = \frac{ d }{ d \theta } \left( \frac{ e^{- \alpha \theta} }{ k } \right) = \frac{ - \alpha e^{-\alpha \theta} }{ k }\] \[\frac{ d^2 }{ d \theta^2 } \left( \frac{ 1 }{ r } \right) = \frac{ \alpha^2 }{ r }\] \[F(r) = \frac{ -l^2 }{ \mu r^2 }\left( \frac{ \alpha ^2 }{ r } +\frac{ 1 }{ r }\right) = \frac{ - l^2 }{ \mu r^3 }(\alpha ^2+1)\]

  45. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    true

  46. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    The force law is attractive inverse cube

  47. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    isn't it r^2 tho?

  48. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    If you want to do something for fun find r(t) and theta (t)

  49. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Nope

  50. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Originally \[\frac{ d^2 }{ d \theta ^2 } \left( \frac{ 1 }{ r } \right)+\frac{ 1 }{ r } = -\frac{ \mu r^2 }{ l^2 }F(r)\]

  51. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    looks mathematically legit

  52. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    I am a little hurt when you said chemistry is more earthly-based :(

  53. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    How is chemistry earthly based

  54. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    It all started from helium and hydrogen being composed in stars, don't get me started please...

  55. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    oh that was another dude hahaha nvm

  56. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    xD

  57. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    FOUND IT http://www.dartmouth.edu/~phys44/lectures/Chap_4.pdf

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