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anonymous

  • one year ago

Ethene has a high electron density at the carbon-carbon double bond. HCl has a high electron density at the Chlorine because Chlorine is more electronegative, causing the molecule to be polar. So why doesn't the Chlorine end react due to being electronegative and attracting the electrons from the double bond?

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  1. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    Chlorine react to what? Ethene?

  2. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    @Woodward

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes, so specifically I'm talking about this reaction, why doesn't this happen: |dw:1438516228526:dw|

  4. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    I haven't been into Chemistry for a long time.... but give me some time... I will definitely try to help you...

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    It's fine I am just curious I'm not taking a class or anything I have a chemistry degree actually haha.

  6. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    could it be that the outer electron around the chlorine has 8 electrons and can't accommodate any more. It's been a long time since I did chemistry so I can;t say i;m a n expert!!

  7. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    wouldn't the ethene be more attracted to the hydrogen ion?

  8. welshfella
    • one year ago
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    since HCl is a polar molecule there would be a partial positive charge on H ion - if that makes sense.

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yeah that makes sense, it's just that it seems kind of paradoxical that Chlorine is more negative specifically because it has attracted more electrons than Hydrogen to start with. So what's stopping it from grabbing one more in the form of a bond to the ethene?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I don't' get you say that is didn't happn, it's' an additions reaction: A + B --> C H-Cl + CH2=CH2 --> CH3-CH2-Cl At least it may be instable cuz the carbocataion it's on the firs C (Markovnikov law)

  11. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    @Bozhena Yes it does happen....

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok, so i don't' get the question ahah

  13. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    I almost forgot so much of chemistry... Good revision..... Thank you....

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh, wait you question is: why chlorine don just stole the electron?

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ahhh I'll clarify, the product you get happens by a different mechanism than I describe. Real way it works: Hydrogen adds to the double bond THEN Chlorine adds. My question is asking: Why doesn't Chlorine add first since it's more electronegative?

  16. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    Okay.. now its interesting....

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438519813752:dw|

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    That's the actual mechanism that it reacts by.

  19. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    hmmm....

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ah, ok. So you need to consider that you are in a liquid solition and HCL is dissociate

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So as CH2CH2 had the doble bond, which make it have a negative electron cloud, the H+ is attracted frist.

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438520103896:dw|

  23. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    sp2 hybridisation

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I agree with everything you're saying, however I don't think it answers my question. Wikipedia says: "Electronegativity is a chemical property that describes the tendency of an atom or a functional group to attract electrons (or electron density) towards itself." Chlorine is more electronegative than Hydrogen, that's why HCl is polar. So why doesn't Chlorine which according to that definition, "attract electrons (or electron density) towards itself" ? Here's the article, first line: - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronegativity

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Cuz the Cl, when bondend had partial negative charge, and when dissociated has negative charge, than mean than it or had a "partial electron" or had one entaire (stoled from H), so he tecnicaly don't need another one. I visualize it like: Chemistry is not homosexual (i hon nothign again homosexuality, it just help me to realize all that molecule stuff), so you know that just negative and positive charges will attract each other, while teo same charge will repell. So the CH2CH2 had electron cloud, which make it slightly negative, and Cl, bondend or dossolved had partial negative charge or negative charge, so they repell each other.

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Hahaha thanks I like that answer.

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ;)

  28. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    Hey I just have this kind of an idea as well , as we know the electron density around the double bond is high right? so its more in to negative than positive. Hence the H which more positive than Cl can go and break that bond. Since we all know that same charges repel , I think the H which is more electropositive compared to Cl will go and add in first . I hope u get what I say.I just want to know what I suggested now is correct! @woodward

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes that's correct! Thanks :D

  30. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    oh well thank oyu @taramgrant0543664 did I argue right ?

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