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anonymous

  • one year ago

what is the degree of the subsequent polynomial? x^5y^3-x^6y^8

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @UsukiDoll

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    can you draw it out?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @midhun.madhu1987

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @arindameducationusc

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm finding you help

  6. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    what is the question asking for? the highest degree term?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[x^{5}y ^{3}-x ^{6}y ^{8}\]

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes! @UsukiDoll

  9. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    the highest degree term is usually the highest exponent number..

  10. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    Its the sum of the variables in the term, when there is more than one variable.

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    my job here is done

  12. wolf1728
    • one year ago
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    I thought it was the highest exponent number also.

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    bye

  14. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    but there's x and y. two variables. so we have to take the sum of those .. at least that's what @zzr0ck3r pointed out

  15. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    So \(x^7y^5+x^3y^3+x^2y^2\) has degree \(12\) because \(12=7+5>3+3>2+2\)

  16. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    there's no all x. it's like comparing 5+3 to 6+8 in this problem .

  17. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    This is from wiki...

  18. wolf1728
    • one year ago
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    Wow - that's new to me. I thought it was just the largest exponent of ANY variable.

  19. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    It is sort of a silly thing to have a definition for. Anyone who would want to to know about the "degree" of a polynomial with more than one variable, I am sure they would want to know information about each variable. So to even have a name for that seems silly, but it does generalize down to the normal definition with one variable.

  20. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    Also, definitions change from book to book, so wiki could be "wrong".

  21. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    @zzr0ck3r is right... it's just that I haven't dealt with more than one variable in a while, but it is the sum... for one variable it's the highest number.

  22. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    Much bigger concepts do not have definitions that are universal. example: \(\mathbb{N}\)

  23. UsukiDoll
    • one year ago
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    natural numbers

  24. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    Some books include \(0\) and some don't.

  25. zzr0ck3r
    • one year ago
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    Huge difference...

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thank you all!

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