anonymous
  • anonymous
Any idea why its best to use up to 20.00 ml of titer instead of a small value such as 1.25 for titration?
Chemistry
chestercat
  • chestercat
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Cuanchi
  • Cuanchi
think about the error associated with both measurements and how this can affect the value of your titration
Cuanchi
  • Cuanchi
http://www.titrations.info/titration-end-point-detection
anonymous
  • anonymous
Oh okay I get it now, THANK YOU!!!

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abb0t
  • abb0t
Titration is a qualitative process, rather than quantitative. The reason is that you want to get a nice curve as well. Uusually looks like this: |dw:1438798641320:dw|
Cuanchi
  • Cuanchi
@abb0t what do you mean for qualitative titration? A titration is a method of analysis that will allow you to determine the precise endpoint of a reaction and therefore the precise quantity of reactant in the titration.
abb0t
  • abb0t
With a curve, it is quantitative, without, it is not. I should rephrase that.
Cuanchi
  • Cuanchi
@abb0t always I have the idea of a titration is a quantitative determination. Can you please mention some examples of qualitative titration and when are them used for?
abb0t
  • abb0t
when constructing a pH curve.
abb0t
  • abb0t
which you then quantify to find the endpoint.
abb0t
  • abb0t
using derivatives.
Cuanchi
  • Cuanchi
@abb0t how can you construct a pH curve without measuring anything? in the curve you represent change of pH in function of the change of volume (concentration, molar fraction, percentage, etc). How can you build the curve without measuring the pH or the volume? since you are measuring something the process became quantitative. IUPAC define titration as follow titration The process of determining the quantity of a substance A by adding measured increments of substance B, with which it reacts (almost always as a standardized solution called the titrant, but also by electrolytic generation, as in coulometric titration) with provision for some means of recognizing (indicating) the endpoint at which essentially all of A has reacted. If the endpoint coincides with the addition of the exact chemical equivalence, it is called the equivalence point or stoichiometric or theoretical endpoint, thus allowing the amount of A to be found from known amounts of B added up to this point, the reacting weight ratio of A to B being known from stoichiometry or otherwise. Terms for varieties of titration can reflect the nature of the reaction between A and B. Thus, there are acid–base, complexometric, chelatometric, oxidation–reduction, and precipitation titrations. Additionally, the term can reflect the nature of the titrant, such as acidimetric, alkalimetric, and iodometric titrations as well as coulometric titrations, in which the titrant is generated electrolytically rather than being added as a standard solution. Source: Orange Book, p. 47 http://goldbook.iupac.org/T06387.html

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