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anonymous

  • one year ago

What is a binomial theorem?

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  1. madhu.mukherjee.946
    • one year ago
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    In elementary algebra, the binomial theorem (or binomial expansion) describes the algebraic expansion of powers of a binomial. According to the theorem, it is possible to expand the power (x + y)n into a sum involving terms of the form a xb yc, where the exponents b and c are nonnegative integers with b + c = n, and the coefficient a of each term is a specific positive integer depending on n and b. For example, (x+y)^4 \;=\; x^4 \,+\, 4 x^3y \,+\, 6 x^2 y^2 \,+\, 4 x y^3 \,+\, y^4.

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh... those are big numbers...

  3. madhu.mukherjee.946
    • one year ago
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    yeah ....did it help you

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Not really, that is exactly how my workbook explains it, and I didn't get that either.

  5. madhu.mukherjee.946
    • one year ago
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    I could never remember the formula for the Binomial Theorem, so instead, I just learned how it worked. I noticed that the powers on each term in the expansion always added up to whatever n was, and that the terms counted up from zero to n. Returning to our intial example of (3x – 2)10, the powers on every term of the expansion will add up to 10, and the powers on the terms will increment by counting up from zero to 10: (3x – 2)10 = 10C0 (3x)10–0(–2)0 + 10C1 (3x)10–1(–2)1 + 10C2 (3x)10–2(–2)2 + 10C3 (3x)10–3(–2)3 + 10C4 (3x)10–4(–2)4 + 10C5 (3x)10–5(–2)5 + 10C6 (3x)10–6(–2)6 + 10C7 (3x)10–7(–2)7 + 10C8 (3x)10–8(–2)8 + 10C9 (3x)10–9(–2)9 + 10C10 (3x)10–10(–2)10

  6. HannahA
    • one year ago
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    a formula for finding any power of a binomial without multiplying at length. this might help: khan academy is my favorite https://www.khanacademy.org/math/algebra2/polynomial_and_rational/binomial_theorem/v/binomial-theorem

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thanks.

  8. HannahA
    • one year ago
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    sure. good luck!

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