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anonymous

  • one year ago

half equation : C2H4 ----> C2H6O2

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  1. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    So I'm assuming you need help balancing this The first step is to add oxygen to balance out the oxygen on each side to do this you have to add H2O Then you have too many hydrogens on one side to balance it out you put hydrogen ions on the side that needs them The last step is to balance out the charges by adding electrons to the side that is more positive so they have the same charge on each side

  2. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    @taramgrant0543664 for acidic and basic reactions, the process the different, right?

  3. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    Yes @arindameducationusc the process is a little different depending on if it's under acidic or under basic conditions normally it says which one it is too Here are the rules I think I have it all: Under acidic conditions: Step 1: Write the skeletons of the oxidation and reduction half-reactions. (The skeleton reactions contain the formulas of the compounds oxidized and reduced, but the atoms and electrons have not yet been balanced.) See Example. Step 2: Balance all elements other than H and O. Step 3: Balance the oxygen atoms by adding H2O molecules where needed. Step 4: Balance the hydrogen atoms by adding H+ ions where needed. Step 5: Balance the charge by adding electrons, e-. Step 6: If the number of electrons lost in the oxidation half-reaction is not equal to the number of electrons gained in the reduction half-reaction, multiply one or both of the half- reactions by a number that will make the number of electrons gained equal to the number of electrons lost. Step 7: Add the 2 half-reactions as if they were mathematical equations. The electrons will always cancel. If the same formulas are found on opposite sides of the half-reactions, you can cancel them. If the same formulas are found on the same side of both half-reactions, combine them. Step 8: Check to make sure that the atoms and the charges balance. Under basic conditions: Steps 1-7: Begin by balancing the equation as if it were in acid solution. If you have H+ ions in your equation at the end of these steps, proceed to Step 8. Otherwise, skip to Step 11. Step 8: Add enough OH− ions to each side to cancel the H+ ions. (Be sure to add the OH− ions to both sides to keep the charge and atoms balanced.) Step 9: Combine the H+ ions and OH− ions that are on the same side of the equation to form water. Step 10: Cancel or combine the H2O molecules. Step 11: Check to make sure that the atoms and the charge balance. If they do balance, you are done. If they do not balance, re-check your work in Steps 1-10.

  4. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    Nice work @taramgrant0543664 ....

  5. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    Thanks!!

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