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anonymous

  • one year ago

A ball bearing is shaped like a sphere and has a diameter of 2.5 cm. What is the volume contained inside the ball bearing? Use 3.14 for pi. Round your answer to the nearest hundredth.

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    anyone

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Use volume formula for sphere (4/3) × pi × radius^3

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Divide the diameter by 2 to get the radius

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[V = \frac{ 4 }{ 3 } \pi r^3\] Use 3.14 for pi and r is 1/2 of the diameter.

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    will that get me to my answer?

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    do you know what i should get?

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @izuru

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What did you get?

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    hold on....i dont understand

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What is the radius?

  13. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438817283240:dw|

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    As explained earlier, radius is 1/2 of the diameter. So what would it be?

  15. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    to get to the nearest hundredth means to 2 decimal places calculate to 3 places. if the 3rd is 5 or more add 1 to the 2nd place. if the 3rd place is less than 5 drop it

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thanks, @triciaal . I think we've got it handled.

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay so...

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What are you having difficulty with?

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the answer

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Well, I won't give you the answer, but I'll help you get it for yourself. Back to my earlier question. What did you get for the radius?

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Recall that the radius is 1/2 of the diameter and the diameter is given as 2.5 cm. So, what is 1/2 of 2.5 cm?

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    hold on

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    0.48

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Nope. Divide 2.5 by 2. What do you get?

  25. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    @ospreytriple do you need a medal?

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    1.25

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Not in it for the medals @triciaal

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    righ

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    t

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    That's correct. So r = 1.25 cm. Now the volume is calculated using\[V = \frac{ 4 }{ 3 } \times 3.14 \times \left( 1.25 \right)^3\]Are you able to do this calculation?

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes? No? Hello?

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Great. What's your answer?

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    hold on

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what did you get

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Won't tell. If you just want someone to give you the answer, I'm the wrong guy. The problem is all done except for the final calculation, which you said you could do. So, what do you get?

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    4.082

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    No. Try again.

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Seems you're not interested in doing the work for yourself, and there are others here that would like some help. So, I'm out. Good luck. Nice working with you.

  40. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    15.3075

  41. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Very close. But not quite.

  42. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    7.97265625

  43. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You have a calculator with you?

  44. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

  45. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    OK. Take it step by step. First, calculate 4/3. Divide 4 by 3. What do you get?

  46. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sorry to sound impatient, but what is taking so long?

  47. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Goodbye.

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