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anonymous

  • one year ago

please help A rectangle has sides measuring (6x + 4) units and (2x + 11) units. Part A: What is the expression that represents the area of the rectangle? Show your work to receive full credit. (4 points) Part B: What are the degree and classification of the expression obtained in Part A? (3 points) Part C: How does Part A demonstrate the closure property for polynomials? (3 points)

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  1. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438825943675:dw|

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    wait do i add like terms or foil this?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    oh nvm

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    can you help with part b ?

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Mertsj

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i was supposed to foil right?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @jim_thompson5910

  8. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    yes. to multiply two binomials, use FOIL

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the answer i got is 12x+66x+8x+44

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    is that correct?

  11. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    What is x times x?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    o so x^2?

  13. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    yes

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    12x^2+66x^2+8x+44?

  15. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438826570048:dw|

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok i understand can you explain part b please

  17. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438826654711:dw|

  18. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    The highest exponent is 2 so it is degree 2 There are three terms so it is a trinomial

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thank you very much can you help with part c and explain it a little more i dont just want the answers

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Mertsj

  21. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    I'll explain the closure property with these examples: 1. The closure property applies to the multiplication of integers because when any two integers are multiplied together, the product is an integer. For example 5 * 2 = 10. 5, 2, and 10 are all integers. 2. The closure property does not apply to the division of integers because not every division of integers results in an integer. Fro example, 5/2 = 2.5. 5 and 2 are integers, but 2.5 is not.

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    this is difficult for me to relate to my problem

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    because i need the closure property of polynomials

  24. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Well, if you multiply polynomials, is the result always a polynomial? If so, there is closure. If not, there isn't.

  25. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    The closure property for multiplication says if you multiply two integers you get an integer so the set of integers is closed for multiplication.

  26. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    The closure property for natural numbers says that if you multiply two natural numbers you get a natural number so the set of natural numbers is said to be closed for multiplication.

  27. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    The closure property for rational numbers says that if you multiply two rational numbers you will get a rational number so the set of rational numbers is said to be closed for multiplication.

  28. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    What do you suppose the closure property for polynomials would be?

  29. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    I'll show you an example of an operation that is not closed. Let's look at division of polynomials. \(\dfrac{5x^2 + 2x - 8}{x} = 5x + 2 - \dfrac{8}{x}\) The quotient is not a polynomial, so polynomials are not closed for division.

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    it would be if you multiply to polynomials you will get another polynomial so the set would be closed

  31. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    Did that work in your example? is 6x+4 a polynomial?

  32. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    Is 2x+11 a polynomial?

  33. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    When you multiplied them you got 12x^2+74x+44 Is that a polynomial?

  34. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    Why aren't you answering my questions?

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no thats a trinomial

  36. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    Is a trinomial a member of the family of polynomials?

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes i think so

  38. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    monomials, binomials, trinomials, four term polynomials...they are all polynomials

  39. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    Just like Chinese, Japanese, and Mexicans are all human beings.

  40. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes i get it now so it demonstrates it when i multiply the terms and still get a polynomial?

  41. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    6x+4 is a binomial and therefore is a polynomial. 2x+11 is a binomial and therefore is a polynomial. 12x^2+74x+44 is a trinomial and therefore is a polynomial.

  42. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thnk you so much i got my answer i really appreciate it

  43. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    So you have shown, at least in this case, that the set of polynomials appears to be closed for multiplication because you multiplied two polynomials and got a polynomial.

  44. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    yw

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