anonymous
  • anonymous
I need help making a narrative essay on "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe i will give a medal
English
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chestercat
  • chestercat
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
I have this so far.. The speaker sits reading in his room crying about the loss of the beautiful wife Lenore when he hears someone knock quietly at the door. When he answers, there is no one there. The tapping comes again, and when he opens the window a raven enters he asks the creature its name, and the raven answers: “Nevermore.” Every time the man speaks, the raven responds with “Nevermore.” The Man assumes the raven learned it from a melancholy master, and anticipates the bird’s departure. The man thinks he feels an angel in the room, come to help him stop dwelling on the “lost Lenore” the raven says “Nevermore” to this and to the narrator’s impassioned desire to know whether there is “balm in Gilead.” The man then asks whether he will ever again see Lenore. The raven answers “Nevermore,” and when the narrator demands he leave, repeats his refrain “Nevermore.”
madhu.mukherjee.946
  • madhu.mukherjee.946
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - The Raven The Raven written by Edgar Allan Poe is a very famous poertry. "The most obvious symbol is the Raven its self. Poe uses the non-reasoning raven because he wants to make us wondering why he had chosen the raven from all the other birds., and frustrate us by wondering why the raven is repeating the word nevermore. He is surprised to hear the bird speak and he thinks that no living human has ever had a bird just sit there and talk to him, and with such a name as Nevermore. This might be the point where he realises that he is dying. It is also important that the answers to the questions are already known, but in a way it helps to illustrate the self-torture the narrator exposes himself to. Another symbol is the Pallas. . It seemed that the bird had a purpose for being there. In the whole room the raven decides toperch on the Greek Goddess of Wisdom, because in a way or another he is trying to make us believe that the raven speaks from wisdom? Or was Poe just using a word only some could interpret? "And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door; And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming, And the lamp-light o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor; And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor Shall be lifted NEVERMORE." Through this quotation the bird has disobeyed him and is just sitting above the door staring at him. His soul is caught under the bird shadow as he passes away and it is lifted up to heaven and his fair Lenore. Poe uses midnight and December for the time the story takes place because both represent an end to something, and alsothe anticipation of something new. A new year comes after midnight, also a new day; and December represents the end of a year. Finally when I picture the room the narrator is positioned in and remembering the past, remembering how weak and weary he felt. He remembers himself he was like a lonely and sorrowful, and the richly furnished room reminds him of his lost love, Lenore. And the tempest (storm) outside shows more of his isolation, and is a contrast between the calmness of the chamber and the tempestuous night. I believe Poe put no moral in " The Raven", but his stories were more like puzzles that he wanted people to poke and pry at , and in the end to accomplish nothing. He has accomplished his goals by making many Poe readers go a little insane by trying to figure out the logic of his insane stories. In summary of this poem I get a feeling of a lonely old man who would accept death until he comes face to face with it, where he fights with all his remaining strength to survive. He issurprised to hear the bird speak and he thinks that no living human hasever had a bird just sit there and talk to him, and with such a name as Nevermore. This might be the point where he realises that he is dying.
madhu.mukherjee.946
  • madhu.mukherjee.946
Edgar Allan Poe The End of The Beginning Edgar Allen Poe was one of the greatest writers of the nineteenth century. Perhaps he is best know for is ominous short stories. One of my personal favorites was called The Raven. Throughout his works Poe used coherent connections between symbols to encourage the reader to dig deep and find the real meaning of his writing. Poe's work is much like a puzzle, when u first see it its intact, but take apart and find there is much more to the story than you thought. The Raven, written in 1845, is a perfect example of Poe at his craziest. Poe's calculated use of symbolism is at his best in this story as each symbol coincides with the others. In The Raven, Poe explains a morbid fear of loneliness and the end of something through symbols. The symbols not only tell the story of the narrator in the poem, they also tell the true story of Poe's own loneliness in life and the hardships he faced. Connected together through imagery they tell a story of a dark world only Poe Knows exists. The story of the Raven tells of a lonely man who has lost his one true love Lenore. As he sits alone in his chamber nearly falling asleep, a raven comes to him. The man has many questions for the raven, yet all the raven replies is "nevermore." Why is the Raven there, this day at his window? Poe starts off by offering insight to the surroundings of the house. He mentions midnight in the first line. In the next paragraph he also speaks of "bleak December." Automatically I remembered the first line of The Purloined letter and the significance the time of month and day had on the story. I believe midnight and December brings up the idea of New Years Eve. The end as well as the begging to many things. It brings up the thought of a Winter darkness, and loneliness for some. Before the story even starts Poe makes you imagine what time of year it is and the feelings those seasons bring. The end of the year marks many holidays for us, with holidays comes family and friends. I believe Poe chooses this time of year to show the reader the narrator has absolutely no one to spend time with. The most important symbol used in the story is the raven. The Raven is know for its dark mysteriousness, something Poe played to his advantage. Also rarely do you see a raven with others, they are somewhat solitary creatures much like the narrator in the story. Already through these two symbols the reader feels like there in a dark lonely place. As the narrator explains his chamber he speaks of beautiful furniture and décor. It must have been a place he shared with his lost Lenore. It is the only beauty Poe speaks of in this story. Otherwise Poe would make it feel dark and dismal much like the narrator feels before the raven comes tapping. Yet the word chamber brings up thoughts of solitary confinement, and the loneliness the narrator now feels with out his lost love. Poe could have used another word besides chamber to describe where the narrator was staying, maybe chamber was the word they used back in the 1800‘s. In the chamber, the Raven "perched upon a bust of Pallas." Most know the Pallas, through Greek mythology as the goddess of wisdom. I found myself wondering, how can it be used in symbolism with the bird if the bird only repeats itself? The raven is anything but wise, unless he has a reason to only mutter one sentence. This statue of the Pallas instead holds the secrets of the chamber, the good and bad times the narrator had with his lost Lenore. The Pallas is wise because it knows the narrator better than he knows himself. The Pallas has watched him through the cycles of his life, from happiness when Lenore was alive, to the sadness when she is taken from him. Lenore herself is an important symbol. She is present in many occasions, wither it be the "rustling of each purple curtain." Or even the "tapping at my chamber door." She represents the happiness the narrator once felt. She also represents the change that comes and the loneliness that follows change. If the reader had an idea how Lenore died maybe we could gain insight to the narrators feelings a bit more. Was she murder? Was it an accident? Knowing what happened to Lenore could justify why the narrator is so miserable without her. Or maybe he just truly misses her. Throughout the story the raven takes on many more tasks. At one point the narrator thinks the raven has been sent by Lenore. It could very well be, "Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad into fancy." The raven actually made him smile. Yet I believe the raven is a creature of bad omen that represents the on coming of death. Yet the narrator still does not know if the bird is good or evil. At one point he calls the raven friend. "Be that word our sign in parting, bird or friend!" Yet the paragraph before The narrator yells "Prophet! Said I, thing of evil! Prophet still, if bird or devil!" The reader never really knows if Poe means the raven to be good or evil. It seems the raven is trying to hint to the narrator something. Maybe that death is upon him, the loneliness is over and it's the start of something new. Or maybe just the end of something old. Through the story it seems the narrator is asking the raven for information about his life and even Lenore. The only thing the Raven has to say is "nevermore." Did Poe purposely make Lenore and nevermore rhyme? Does nevermore mean just simply never again? Never again will the narrator be lonely or feel the loneliness he does when the raven arrives. When we talk of death there are two places we go after. Heaven or hell. The Raven is here to tell the narrator nevermore will you be lonely like you are now. It is the end of loneliness much like it is the end of the year. I think The raven plays the roll of the undertaker in this story. On the contrary the raven replies "nevermore," to all his thoughts and longings, the narrator could in fact be asking the raven if he will ever see his lost Lenore again. We all know the answer to that question, nevermore. Instead of the raven rescuing the narrator from loneliness he could be delivering a kind of loneliness no one has ever experienced. There are so many ways to interpret the symbols Poe brings to the table. From the beginning to the end of the story the reader witnesses the narrator slowly grow more angry and frustrated with the raven. By the end of the story the narrator is still asking the raven questions yet expecting a different answer. Starting with innocent amusing remarks the narrator grows intense and his reason rapidly diminishes. "And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor shall be lifted--nevermore." In this last verse, the narrator finally meets his maker. It is uncertain exactly how, yet knowing Poe the narrator most likely took his own life. Was this real? Or was the narrator dreaming the whole time? The narrator could have fallen asleep while reading his book. "While I nodded, nearly napping." Maybe this was only a dream telling him to forget about Lenore, he will never see her again, nevermore. Edgar Alan Poe wrote The Raven in a very painful condition of mind. His wife had been sick for sometime while he wrote this poem. I think the pain from the narrator comes from Poe's fear of losing his wife. Poe's ability to connect these symbols is a talent rarely seen by a reader. The self torture the narrator experiences can reflect us in our own lives. Every person goes through hardships. His blending of symbols, such as the chamber and seasons, the over all dark atmosphere and the raven on the Pallas all contribute to Poe's genius. No matter the readers interpretation of the poem every person can take something out of this story and use it in their daily life. "Quoth the Raven, nevermore."

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madhu.mukherjee.946
  • madhu.mukherjee.946
The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe is a narrative of a young man who is bereaved by the death of the woman he loved. He compulsorily constructs self-destructive meaning around a raven’s repetition of the word 'Nevermore', until he finally despairs of being reunited with his beloved Lenore in another world. Just because of the nightmarish effect, the poem cannot be called an elegy. In fact, “The Raven” is a ballad of eighteen six –line stanzas with decidedly emphatic meter and rhymes. Narrated from the first person point of view, the poem conveys, with dramatic immediacy, the speaker’s shift from weary, sorrowful composure to a state of nervous collapse as he recounts his strange experience with the mysterious ebony bird. The first seven stanzas establish the setting and the narrator’s melancholic, impressionable state of mind. Weak and worn out with grief, the speaker had sought distraction from his sorrow by reading curiously esoteric books. Awakened at midnight by a sound outside his chamber, he opens the door, expecting a visitor; he finds only darkness. Apprehensive, he whispers the name Lenore and closes the door. When the tapping persists, he opens a window, admitting a raven that perches upon a bust of Pallas (Athena). In stanza 8 to 11, the narrator, beguiled by the ludicrous image of the blackbird in his room, playfully asks the raven its name, as if to reassure himself that it portends nothing ominous. He is startled, however, to hear the raven respond, saying, “Nevermore”. Although the word apparently has little relevance to any discoverable meaning, the narrator is sobered by the bird’s forlorn utterance. He assumes that the raven’s owner, having suffered unendurable disasters, taught the bird to imitate human speech in order to utter the one word most expressive of the owner’s sense of hopelessness. In stanza 12 and 13, the narrator settles himself on a velvet cushion in front of the bird and whimsically ponders what the raven meant by repeating a word he inevitably associated with thoughts of the departed Lenore. At this point, the grieving lover, in anticipation of the raven’s maddening repetition of “Nevermore,” begins masochistically to frame increasingly painful questions. Imagining a perfumed presence in the room, the narrator, in a state of growing agitation, asks the raven whether God had mercifully sent him to inducer in the poet forgetfulness of lost Lenore; the inevitable response causes the narrator to plead with the raven – now addressed as a prophet of evil sent by the “Temptor”- to tell him whether there is any healing in heaven for his grief. The raven’s predictable answer provokes the grieving lover, now almost in a state of maddened frenzy, to ask bluntly whether his soul would ever be reunited with Lenore in heaven. Receiving the horrific “Nevermore” in reply to his ultimate question, the distraught narrator demands that the raven, whether actual bird or fiend, leave his chambers and quit torturing his heart; the raven’s unendurable answer drives the bereaved love into a state of maddened despair. The raven becomes a permanent fixture in the room, a symbolic presence presiding over the narrator’s self-inflicted mental and spiritual collapse. The physical setting of the poem reflects the inner personality or emotion of the central character. The poem begins at midnight in December…. the last moment of a spend day in the final month of the year. Internally and externally, it is a time of death and decay. Even the “dying” fireplace embers reflect the melancholic atmosphere. The setting is contained and claustrophobic; the single room adds to this effect. The narrator himself mirrors the time and locale. “Weak and weary”, he seems trapped in his richly furnished prison. He hopes for the morning – the return of light and life – but tonight all he can do is brood on his dead beloved, “the lost Lenore”, and feel the solid horror of his current situation. The story that now unfolds is simple, tarrying and tragic. “The Raven” divides its characters and imagery into two conflicting worlds of light and darkness. The contrasting worlds of light and darkness grandly acquire additional symbolic resonances: they also represent life and death, the speaker’s vain hope of an after- life with Lenore and the terrifying vision of eternal nothingness. The nightmarish effect of the poem is reinforced by the relentless trochaic rhythm and the arrangement of the ballad stanzas into five lines or octameter followed by a refrain in tetrameter. This combination, along with emphatic alliteration, allows for strong internal and end rhymes, resulting in a mesmerizing syncopation of redundancies as inescapable as the sonorous refrain. This incantatory repetition creates an aural quality that helps force collaboration between the poem and the reader, a maddening regularity aptly conveying the speaker’s disintegrating reason, while contributing to the theatrical effect of the poem as histrionic performance.
anonymous
  • anonymous
thank youu

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