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anonymous

  • one year ago

In a reaction with 15.0 grams of the first reactant and 15.0 grams of the second reactant how many total grams of the definite product should we theoretically see at the end of the experiment?

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  1. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    X+Y--> XY 15+15-->? If it's a simple addition reaction you should be able to add them together assuming that no product is lost durin the reaction

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @taramgrant0543664 is right, but generally a chemical equation is always considered in molar ratios...Example: Na+ + Cl- --> NaCl Here we would be saying 1 mol of Na + 1 mol of Cl will yield 1mol of NaCl In the case of this example if we had 15g of Na and 15g of Cl first we would have to calculate how many moles of each we have \[15 g Na / 22.99g/mol = 0.652mol Na\] \[15 g Cl /35.45g/mol = 0.422mol Cl\] In this case Cl would be a limiting reactant and we could only react 0.422mol of the Na with 0.422mol of the Cl to get 0.422 mol of NaCl. Now we could calculate the total mass in grams of NaCl formed if we know this reaction would produce 0.422mol \[(0.422mol)*(22.99g/mol+35.45g/mol) = 24.66 g\] So in this case we would actually get a bit less than 30g from just adding the masses of the original reactants. However, I suppose if you reacted 15g of Hydrogen with 15g of Hydrogen you could theorically get 30g of H2 since all reactants and products have the exact same molar mass. -Hope this helps!

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thanks!

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