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anonymous

  • one year ago

Which polygons are similar?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @izuru

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @mathstudent55

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @mathway

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Try to figure out the proportion of all the two pairs of polygons first.

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    8 and 10 for first 50 and 30 for 2nd 36 and 48 for 3rd 21 and 30 for the 4th

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @izuru

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @izuru ?

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @mathstudent55

  9. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Do you know what is needed for two polygons to be similar?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no but i just need to get this done quick its been 10 minutes all ready. :(

  11. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Two polygons are similar if each pair of corresponding angles is congruent, and if the ratios of the lengths of corresponding sides are equal.

  12. madhu.mukherjee.946
    • one year ago
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    If two polygons are similar, then the ratio of the lengths of the two corresponding sides is the scale factor.

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @mathstudent55 ??

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    please @madhu.mukherjee.946 help or @mathstudent55

  15. madhu.mukherjee.946
    • one year ago
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    i have already told you

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok so i'm thinking D

  17. madhu.mukherjee.946
    • one year ago
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    you go to check both the polygons and see if they are similar based on the the two conditiond

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    well the only ones that are really similar is D

  19. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Let's look at the first choice. Is 6/7 = 2/3? No, not even close, so eliminate choice A.

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay so all the proportions are: rectangle: \[\[\frac{ 7 }{ 6 }=\frac{ 2 }{ 3 }\]\] right triangle: \[\frac{ 9}{ 15 }=\frac{ 21 }{ 35 }\] trapezoid: \[\frac{ 12 }{ 18 }=\frac{ 24 }{ 30 }\] isoceles: \[\frac{ 12}{ 9 }=\frac{ 12 }{ 9 }\] Figure out which ones are congruent.

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ive been saying D -_-

  22. madhu.mukherjee.946
    • one year ago
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    its d

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    but thank you very much @izuru

  24. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Choice B. Is 15/9 = 35/21 ? Let's reduce both fractions: 5/3 = 5/3 Yes, it works. Choice B works.

  25. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Choice C. Is 12/18 = 24/30 ? Reducing, we get: 2/3 = 4/5. Not true. Choice C does not work.

  26. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    Choice D. Is 12/9 = 12/9 = 6/3 ? Reducing we get: 4/3 = 4/3 = 2/1. Not true. Choice also does not work. The only answer is Choice B.

  27. madhu.mukherjee.946
    • one year ago
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    okay

  28. madhu.mukherjee.946
    • one year ago
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    thanks

  29. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    In choice A, we are given two quadrilaterals. All angles are right angles, so we know they are rectangles. Since rectangles are parallelograms, opposite sides are congruent. Checking the length ratios of two pairs of adjacent sides, that is enough to know whether they are or are not similar. In this case, they were not. In choice B, we deal with triangles. We are given the lengths of two pairs of sides and their included angles. Since the sides were of proportional length, and the included angles were congruent, then by SAS Similarity, the triangles are similar. In choice C, we have quadrilaterals again. We are given two pairs of sides. We assume those sides were corresponding. It turned out their lengths were not proportional, so we can say the quadrilaterals are not similar. The problem here is that even if the side lengths had turned out to be proportional, we would not be able to conclude the quadrilaterals are similar because we don't know about the other 2 of pairs of angles or the other two pairs of sides. In choice D, we were given two triangles and the lengths of all six sides. If every pair of corresponding sides were in the same ratio, then by SSS Similarity, we would be able to conclude the triangles are similar, but only 2 pairs of sides were in the same ratio. The third pair of sides is not, so the triangles are not similar.

  30. mathstudent55
    • one year ago
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    You're welcome.

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