anonymous
  • anonymous
How to Eject a electron from an atom??
Chemistry
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
@Nnesha
anonymous
  • anonymous
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anonymous
  • anonymous
@sammixboo @Luigi0210

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Based on your question I think you are asking about "Ionization Energy". Essentialy if you impart enough energy onto an atom or molecule in some way it can become ionized when it either looses (or gains) electrons. There are a number of ways this can be done, however there is an excellent wikipedia article on ionization energy https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ionization_energy. As a short answer tho, if you wanted to accomplish this you could heat a gas untill it becomes a plasma. Also ionization energy is a property of the periodic table, it takes a lot less energy to remove electrons from things on the far left of the table than on the far right (ie: Na takes less energy to remove an electron than Cl)
shreehari499
  • shreehari499
Photoelectric Effect can also be explained here. The atoms get excited and eject electron on exposure of light
JFraser
  • JFraser
smack it with light
Ciarán95
  • Ciarán95
Every electron in an atom will have a certain 'energy level' associated with it. This level is usually defined by the principal quantum number, n. If we were to imagine a really simplistic view of the electrons in an atom (i.e. the Bohr model), then these energy levels would be like levels of 'rings' which the electrons are fixed to as they orbit the nucleus. n=1 would be the lowest energy level, designated for electrons which are orbiting closest to the nucleus (i.e. the highest interaction with the nucleus' positive charge). A certain number of electrons will 'fit' into each of these energy levels (Aufbau Principle) and we can fill these up for the electrons in any given atom until we reach those in the outer shell, or outer energy level. The electrons located in each of our rings will have a certain fixed energy. This outer shell is commonly referred to as the valence shell (containing the valence electrons), and will vary depending on the row/period of the periodic table the element is located and the atom's electronic configuration (for example, oxygen's valence shell is at the n=2 energy level, as it is in the second period across). Now that we've established our 'energy levels' for the orbiting electrons, we can look at transitions of electrons between energy levels. If we have an electron in a given energy level (say n = a) and we want to promote it to a higher energy level (say n = b), we have to supply it with energy in order to 'move' it from the nice, stable spot it is in to a more unstable spot. In doing so, we must supply it with enough energy to match those of the electrons already present at that n = b level (if there are any present). As the transition involves promotion from one fixed energy level to another, the amount of energy needed to be absorbed is also fixed (i.e. Energy Gap Overcome = (Energy of b) - (Energy of a)). This can be provided be allowing the electron to 'absorb' energy in the form of photons (little energy packets) of light. In a similar manner, if an electron was to be demoted from b to a, then a fixed amount of energy would be released in order for that electron to move into the more stable energy level, closer to the nucleus of the atom. This energy would be given out in the form of light of a certain frequency (energy). (Continued)
Ciarán95
  • Ciarán95
The most loosely bound electrons in any given atom will be the valence electrons, in the outer shell. These will have the highest energy and are the furthest distance/most screened from the attractive positive charge of the nucleus in the centre. So, if we want to remove an electron, this is most likely where we're looking at. To do this, we need to consider property called the ionisation energy of an atom. The (first) ionisation energy is the minimum energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron from a neutral gaseous atom. We can describe this in terms of transitions between energy levels also.....in the case of oxygen, we are promoting an electron from the valence shell (n = 2) up to the n = infinity energy level. Here, it has reached the point where it no longer feels any 'pull' from the positive charge of the nucleus and is effectively free to move around wherever it wants. The oxygen atom now has one less electron than proton, leaving it with an overall positive charge (an ion). \[O \rightarrow O ^{+}+ e ^{-}\] The amount of energy we need to supply in order to allow this transition to occur depends on the relative energy/stability of the valence electrons themselves in a given atom. This can vary depending on how far they are from the nucleus, the effectiveness of the positive charge of the nucleus keeping them in place and the degree of protection they have from this charge by the electrons in between them an the nucleus (the 'shielding' effect). Hope that helped! :)

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