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Photon336

  • one year ago

Which of the following solutions will behave closest to an ideal solution?

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  1. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    \[0.01 M CaCl _{2}\] \[0.01 M NaCl \] \[0.01 M Na _{2}SO _{3} \] \[0.01M Al _{2}(SO4)_{3}\]

  2. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Not that sure with this one

  3. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @sweetburger

  4. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    is it 2?

  5. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @Rushwr That's correct

  6. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    how did you come to that answer? just curious

  7. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    Least attraction forces. What I thought was in an solution it breaks in to ions ? @ !

  8. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    yeah NaOH --> Na+ Cl-

  9. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    yeah apply raoult's law and see. deviatinos

  10. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    This is the explanation from none other than (wikipedia) "Ideality of solutions is analogous to ideality for gases, with the important difference that intermolecular interactions in liquids are strong and cannot simply be neglected as they can for ideal gases. Instead we assume that the mean strength of the interactions are the same between all the molecules of the solution. More formally, for a mix of molecules of A and B, the interactions between unlike neighbors (UAB) and like neighbors UAA and UBB must be of the same average strength, i.e., 2 UAB = UAA + UBB and the longer-range interactions must be nil (or at least indistinguishable). If the molecular forces are the same between AA, AB and BB, i.e., UAB = UAA = UBB, then the solution is automatically ideal. If the molecules are almost identical chemically, e.g., 1-butanol and 2-butanol, then the solution will be almost ideal. Since the interaction energies between A and B are almost equal, it follows that there is a very small overall energy (enthalpy) change when the substances are mixed. The more dissimilar the nature of A and B, the more strongly the solution is expected to deviate from ideality."

  11. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    like paragraph one is saying that the ideal solutions are kind of like ideal gases. but it's like you can't ignore that in solution there are going to be some intermolecular forces of attraction.

  12. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    the "mean strength of interactions are the same" across the board.

  13. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Also the molecular forces between the molecules must be the same too

  14. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    They are arguing that |dw:1438974657573:dw| those two molecules if mixed would be ideal they are saying because the interactions between them would be similar.

  15. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    Since they are asking Ideal behaviour !

  16. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Let's apply this to the answer choices.

  17. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438974760572:dw| Not really sure but I feel that for NaCl the interactions would be the same? if they are in water. (not sure about this)

  18. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @Woodward do you know why NaCl would be the most ideal, and not the other three. I'm kind of stuck explaining the answer.

  19. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    I'm going to keep this question open. (I don't think this has to do clearly with the number of ions in solution)

  20. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @abb0t thoughts? why would NaCl be the most ideal out out of the other three?

  21. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    Even I am stucked in explaning part

  22. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    I'm not pretty sure but how I took this was taking the solution which had equal like attraction intensities !

  23. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    Like in other cases they weren't equal right

  24. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438975975370:dw|

  25. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    So ithought that would show the least deviation !

  26. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    makes sense @Rushwr least deviation because of fewest attractions?

  27. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    yeah !

  28. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    I was basing my interpretation off what wikipedia said.

  29. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    said like the type of attractions are the same throughout.

  30. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    really not sure

  31. Rushwr
    • one year ago
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    I'm not sure if I am correct but that's how I thought. I think we better solve this @taramgrant0543664

  32. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @Bozhena

  33. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    So Im assuming that it's the enthalpy of mixing meaning the more ideal the closer to zero (Delta Hmix). Enthalpy depends on the number of bonds broken in the reactants and the bonds formed in the products, seeing as there is only one option with the 1:1 ratio that would be it

  34. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @taramgrant0543664 that's Enthalpy = \[\Sigma bonds broken - \Sigma Bonds formed \] NaCl--> Na+ Cl- One bond broken; what bond is formed?

  35. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    I'll read up more on this

  36. taramgrant0543664
    • one year ago
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    Well there isn't really a bond on the one side there's just the electrostatic attraction between the two ions and eventually they combine due to the force of attraction

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