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anonymous

  • one year ago

what is the simplest form of this expression 4(-5y+4)+(-7)(-3y+1)

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  1. Owlcoffee
    • one year ago
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    Apply the distributive property and operate similar terms, that'd give you the answer.

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    need more help then that

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Nnesha

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @welshfella

  5. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    distribute parentheses by outside terms (as owl suggested )

  6. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    here is an example \[\huge\rm \color{red}{a}(b+c)=\color{red}{a} \times b + \color{red}{a} \times c =\color{reD}{a}b+\color{reD}{a}c\]

  7. Nnesha
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1438981491633:dw|

  8. Owlcoffee
    • one year ago
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    Just to extend Nneshas suggestion: \[(4)(-5y)+(4)(4)+(-7)(-3y)+(-7)(1)\]

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    -20y+16+21y+-7 ?

  10. Owlcoffee
    • one year ago
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    Good, now, operate the terms that do and do not have "y" on their right side.

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what do you mean

  12. Owlcoffee
    • one year ago
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    It will look like this: \[(-20+21)y +(16-7)\]

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay and can you just show me how to solve this step by step like in one of those pics things so i can fully understand this

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ?

  15. Owlcoffee
    • one year ago
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    Starting out with: \[4(-5y+4)+(-7)(-3y+1)\] Whenever you want to simplify any mathematical expression you first get rid of what is called "groupings", which in this case is the parenthesis, so in order to do that, you always apply Distributive property: \(a(b+c)=ab+ac\) So, applying distributive property on the first and second parenthesis with their corresponding "outside term": \[-20y+16+21y-7\] This is a much simpler way of viewing the first mathematical expression but not the simplest, so in order to simplify it more, we will get rid of operations, those being addition and sustraction as you can see. The only way to do that is to reduce the terms of the mathematical expression, you might as well know that a "term" in mathematics is any number, variable or both, separated by a basic operation, that being "+" or "-". And we can reduce terms if we can see that the only variable present is "y" and there are more than one term with a "y" on them, so we will take "common factor" (Which is the reverse of distributive) "y" on the terms that has it: \[(-20+21)y+16-7\] That is also called "grouping like terms". now it's just a matter of arithmetics, which I will suppose you already know: \[(1)y+9\] Or better written as: \[y+9\]

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thank you

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