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anonymous

  • one year ago

Phyiscs question

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i know i have to use v=d/t , i was getting the wrong answer

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  2. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    I'm sorry, I'm not good with astronomy, since I have studied nuclear physics mainly when I was at university

  3. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    \(\large c_{est} = \frac{d}{t} =\frac{3 \times 10^{11}}{19 \times 60} = ???\)

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @IrishBoy123 what confused me about the question is dont u have to measure the distance from going to coming ? so like take the distance and timising by 2 ?

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what makes this question different?

  6. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    **distance from going to coming** that to me does not really have any meaning. this is a simple skit about the fact that light itself has a "finite" speed. so, the amateur astronomers assumed instantaneous light , and worked out something different.!? not sure this helps too much.

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @IrishBoy123 can u help me with this one ?

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  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @IrishBoy123

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @IrishBoy123 u there?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Astrophysics

  11. danica518
    • one year ago
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    okay diverging lens so the ray are spreading out

  12. danica518
    • one year ago
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    http://prntscr.com/82v3o9

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    can u show me some steps

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Astrophysics

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @shreehari499

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @shreehari499 http://assets.openstudy.com/updates/attachments/55c59591e4b0c7f4a97933d8-ilovehw-1439062524938-jdjdjjd.jpg

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